One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

The ‘revolutionary’ programs giving hope to LGBT domestic violence survivors

Updated 

Studies show people in same-sex relationships experience domestic violence at similar — and possibly higher — rates as opposite-sex couples.

But until recently survivors have suffered in silence and worse, been ignored and misunderstood by the health professionals and police who are supposed to help them, because of the persistent stigma and shame surrounding LGBT abuse and misconceptions that especially lesbian couples are immune from it.

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: report (Link fixed)

Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2017

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years. Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes.

Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common. This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime. Much of what we know about sexual crime is imagined or gained through mainstream media

Most people would not be fully aware of the vast body of scientific literature regarding sexual offending. This is despite the fact that specialist knowledge is the key to effectively responding to sexual crime in the criminal justice system .

The purpose of this resource is to synthesise over 40 years of research evidence to present an accurate and updated picture of sexual offending. With specialist knowledge, we can work towards improving criminal justice responses
and outcomes in cases of sexual crime.

» This reference booklet addresses some of the most significant myths and misconceptions about adult rape and sexual offences, as well as child sexual abuse.
» The evidence has been collated from an analysis of the psychological and criminological literature.
» It provides a clear picture of what should be considered a misconception, alongside the current evidence of what is considered “typical” and “common” behaviour in both offenders and victims.
» There are multiple ways that this resource could be used. It may be useful as a guide to assist fact finders at different stages of the criminal justice process.

 

Improving Cultural Understanding & Engagement with People from ATSI Communities

Improving Cultural Understanding and Engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: Practical learnings to improve your practice (Webinar)

1800RESPECT , October 2016

The details

When: Thursday, December 1, 2016

What Time: 01:00 PM AEDT

Duration: 45 minutes

Where: Online – wherever you like!

Presenter: Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Cost: Free!

What’s your timezone?

NSW, ACT, VIC, TAS: 1.00 pm – 1.45pm

SA: 12.30 pm – 1.15 pm

QLD: 12.00 pm – 12.45 pm

NT: 11.30 pm – 12.15 pm

WA: 10.00 am – 11.45 pm

About the webinar

Family violence is a serious problem for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities around the nation. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 35 times more likely to be hospitalised and twice as likely to die as an outcome of family violence compared to other Australian women. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are over nine times as likely to be on care and protection orders and ten times more likely to be in out of home care than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. There are also lower reporting rates as women are known to face specific and additional barriers to reporting in their communities. The impacts of family violence are compounded by the fact that survivors of violence may not have access to culturally appropriate services or supports, may be distrustful of the justice system, and already experience significant socioeconomic disadvantage and marginalisation.

This webinar will explore the complexities of domestic and Aboriginal family violence, provide insights into greater Aboriginal cultural competency and community engagement, and share best practice approaches to recognising and responding for frontline workers across all sectors.

You can make a difference by watching this webinar and finding out what you can do to help break the cycle of violence, and increase the safety of women and children.

Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Craig is currently the CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY) an Aboriginal not for profit organisation based in Adelaide that works closely with the specialist homelessness and domestic violence services state wide.

Craig currently holds a range of representative positions including the Minister appointed – Aboriginal Community Leadership Reference Group – providing crucial advice regarding the government response to the Nyland Child Protection Systems Royal Commission Report to cabinet, South Australian Council of Social Services (SACOSS), the Coalition of Women’s Domestic Violence Services and the Coalition for Men Supporting Non-Violence.

He recently launched The Aboriginal Family Violence Program (AFVP) focusing on women who want to stay in their relationships. The program recognises the importance of culturally appropriate safety responses for Aboriginal women and children experiencing family violence.

Register here 

‘My dog is family’: domestic abuse victims and the pets they can’t leave

Guardian, Thursday 16 June 2016

Leaving an abuser can be one of the most dangerous times for a victim. But if you have a pet, leaving is even harder. Almost half of abused victims will delay their departure if they cannot bring their animals.

Read more here 

Stepping Stones: Legal barriers to economic equality after family violence

Women’s Legal Service Victoria, Melbourne , 2015

From Executive Summary:

Legal and economic problems arise from family violence which result in serious financial hardship for women and, at present, there are no accessible legal remedies to these problems.

We have researched the problems in the Stepping Stones project. This report contains the findings of the project and recommendations for solutions.
In interviews with women, we explored the consequences of family violence on women’s financial circumstances. We specifically directed our attention to systemic barriers women faced in their economic recovery.”

Download report (PDF) here