New Bacterial Vaginosis Fact Sheet

SHINE SA, May 2019

SHINE SA has recently produced a bacterial vaginosis fact sheet. 

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a condition where there are too many of a certain type of bacteria in the vagina. Bacteria which are normally present in small numbers can sometimes overgrow, causing bacterial vaginosis.

Bacterial vaginosis is not a sexually transmitted infection. Bacterial vaginosis can occur when conditions in the vagina change and upset the normal balance of bacteria. It can be associated with new or increased sexual activity or with other changes such as menstruation or sexually transmitted infections.

How to redesign the vaginal speculum

Guardian, Tue 24 Apr 2018 

Cervical screening is at its lowest rate in 19 years. The Jade Goody effect, named for the increase in women attending screening after the reality TV star died of the disease in 2009, has disappeared. In 2015 and 2016, only 72.7% of eligible women went to a screening when invited. That doesn’t sound too bad, but it means 1.2 million women didn’t attend.

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Authors

Denton Callander, PhD,*† Hamish McManus, PhD,* Rebecca Guy, PhD,* Margaret Hellard, PhD,‡ Catherine C. O’Connor, DrPH,*§¶ Christopher K. Fairley, PhD,||** Eric P.F. Chow, PhD,||** Anna McNulty, MM,†† David A. Lewis, DA, PhD,‡‡§§ Christopher Carmody, MB, BS,¶¶ Heather-Marie A. Schmidt, PhD,|||| Jules Kim,*** and Basil Donovan, MD*††

From the *The Kirby Institute, †Centre for Social Research in Health,
UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW; ‡Burnet Institute, Melbourne, VIC;
§RPA Sexual Health Clinic, Community Health, Sydney Local Health
District; ¶Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW;
||Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health; **Central Clinical
School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash
University, Melbourne, VIC; ††Sydney Sexual Health Centre,
Sydney Hospital, Sydney; ‡‡Western Sydney Sexual Health Centre,
Parramatta; §§Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and
Biosecurity & Sydney Medical School-Westmead, University of
Sydney, Sydney; ¶¶Liverpool Sexual Health Centre, Liverpool; ||||
New South Wales Ministry of Health; and ***Scarlet Alliance, Australian
Sex Worker Association, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Abstract:

Background: Female sex workers in Australia have achieved some of the lowest documented prevalences of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmissible infections globally but rates overall are increasing in Australia and warrant closer investigation.

Methods: We constructed a retrospective cohort using repeat testing data extracted from a network of 42 sexual health clinics. Poisson and Cox regression were used to determined trends in incidence and risk factors for HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and infectious syphilis among female sex workers.

Results: From 2009 to 2015, 18,475 women reporting sex work attended a participating service. The overall incidence of urogenital chlamydia was 7.7/100 person years (PY), declining by 38% from 2009 to 2013 before increasing by 43% to 2015 (P < 0.001); anorectal chlamydia incidence was 0.6/100 PY, and pharyngeal was 1.9/100 PY, which increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.001, both). For gonorrhoea, the urogenital incidence was 1.4/100 PY, anorectal incidence was 0.3/100 PY, P < 0.001), and 3.6/100 PY for pharyngeal; urogenital incidence doubled during the study period, anorectal increased fivefold, and pharyngeal more than tripled (P < 0.001, all). Incidence of infectious syphilis was 0.4/100 PY, which remained stable from 2009 to 2015 (P = 0.09). There were seven incident infections of HIV among female sex workers (0.1/100 PY). Inconsistent condom use with private partners, higher number of private partner numbers, recent injecting drug use, younger age, and country of birth variously predicted sexually transmissible infections among female sex workers.

Conclusions: Although infectious syphilis and HIV remain uncommon in female sex workers attending Australian sexual health clinics, the increasing incidence of gonorrhoea across anatomical sites and increasing chlamydia after a period of decline demands enhanced health promotion initiatives.

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Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia: A Retrospective Cohort Study (PDF)

Design Agency ‘Frog’ Redesigns The Dreaded Gynecology Exam

co.design

Cold metal. Eerie clicking sound. Torturous duck-billed shape. Yes, I’m talking about the speculum, the anxiety-inducing device that doctors use to check  vaginal health. Despite its status as an instrument of discomfort and its dark history–involving a doctor who experimented on slave women – the speculum remains to this day one of the centerpieces of the often dreaded annual pelvic exam.

A team of four designers at the global design agency Frog is on a mission to redesign it – and reimagine what it means to go to the gynecologist in the first place.

In[ter]view: SHINE SA’s Dr Amy Moten

Verse magazine, Edition 18, September 2017

This edition we talked to Amy, SHINE SA’s Medical Educator, who is answering all your questions when it comes to the ‘what’s this’ and ‘how do I check that’ of sex.

  1. How often should people who are sexually active get tested?

You should have a test when symptoms of a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) are first noticed or if a sexual partner is diagnosed with an STI or has symptoms of an STI. Even if you have no symptoms STI screening is recommended for any new sexual contact. Annual screening for people under 30 is recommended, but you can have a test every 3 months if you think you may be at higher risk.

 

New booklet: Vulva & vaginal irritation

Jean Hailes, Last updated 05 May 2017

Jean Hailes has just released a new patient information booklet: The vulva: irritation, diagnosis & treatment. 

Contents:

  • What is normal?
  • Causes of vulva irritation
  • Management & treatment
  • Dryness
  • ‘Good bacteria’ versus ‘bad bacteria’ in the vagina
  • Other natural therapies
  • Irritation
  • Diagnosis
  • Secretions or discharge
  • Odour
  • Probiotics
  • What is the vulva?

Download booklet (PDF) here