80% of new HIV cases transmitted by undiagnosed or untreated people

Healio, March 18, 2019

In 2016, more than 80% of new HIV infections in the United States were transmitted by individuals who either did not know they were infected with HIV or had been diagnosed but were not receiving care, according to data released on the first day of the National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.

Giving gay men self-test kits increases HIV testing by 50% – but STI tests decrease

aidsmap/nam, 21 August 2018

Gay men who were offered HIV home-testing kits took 50% more tests than men who only took HIV tests at clinics or community organisations, a randomised controlled study from Seattle in the USA has found.

The men who could self-test took fewer tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), though it is not completely clear whether this was because they went less often for STI checkups or had fewer STI symptoms.

 

Surgeon Who Was Denied Disability Insurance for Taking PrEP Tells His Story

Earlier this year, urology resident Dr. Philip Cheng appeared on the front page of the New York Times. Here was the headline: He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.

The piece understandably drew widespread attention, with sharp disapproval of the denial from ID specialists and public health officials. We couldn’t understand why someone adopting the recommended strategy for HIV prevention was being penalized.

In this Open Forum Infectious Diseases podcast, he tells us some more about himself and the events surrounding his decision.

Startling Data Reveals Half of LGBTQ Employees in the U.S. Remain Closeted at Work

Human Rights Campaign, June 25, 2018

The HRC Foundation released the results of a survey of employees across the USA, revealing the persistent daily challenges that have led nearly half of LGBTQ people to remain closeted at their workplaces — a rate largely unchanged over the past decade. 

A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers NationwideHRC’s third national workplace study over the past decade, shines a light on the often-intangible, nuanced issues in the workplace that keep LGBTQ workers “separate,” leaving many feeling distracted, exhausted or depressed, and believing they have nowhere to turn for help.

The survey of both LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ workers reveals that, despite significant progress in recent years — including the Supreme Court of the United State’s decision embracing marriage equality in 2015, as well as corporate policies and practices that increasing embrace LGBTQ inclusion, substantial barriers to full inclusion. Many of these barriers exist within interpersonal workplace connections, including non-work conversations or outings among coworkers.

  • The full report, A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers Nationwide, can be found here.

Religious refusal laws harm sexual minority mental health, study finds

ScienceDaily, 23 May 2018.

A new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher has found that state laws permitting the denial of services to same-sex couples because of religious or moral beliefs harm the mental health of sexual minority adults in those states.

The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, found these laws were associated with a 46 percent increase in the proportion of sexual minority adults experiencing mental distress.

Temporary open access to special journal issue on Trans Youth in Education

Sex Education, volume 18, 2018: Special Issue on Trans Youth in Education

Sex Education journal has published a special issue on Trans Youth in Education.  This is now out and is available on Open Access for a few weeks only.