New online learning from ASHM tackles stigma and discrimination in healthcare

The Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM), 1 st March 2019

To mark Zero Discrimination Day, today ASHM has launched Removing Barriers, a new online learning tool for addressing stigma and discrimination in healthcare settings against people affected by HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. 

The Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM) received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to address systemic barriers and stigma and discrimination to increase access to the health system by people at risk of or with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV.

“Removing Barriers makes it everybody’s business to change what we say, change what we do and work together in removing the unacceptable barriers of stigma and discrimination across the health system.”

Public health and HIV viral load suppression

UNAIDS, 19 JULY 2017

Key messages:

1. There is growing scientific consensus that people living with HIV who are taking effective antiretroviral therapy and whose virus is suppressed to undetectable levels will not transmit HIV sexually.

2. Treatment is first and foremost about enabling the person living with HIV to regain and maintain good health. Globally, there needs to be better access to viral load assays at affordable prices, combined with effective laboratory systems and robust health services. Stronger efforts should be in place to ensure that all people living with HIV have access to treatment as soon as they are diagnosed.

3. The Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention10 framework of the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+) and UNAIDS lays out important principles for involving people living with HIV and ensuring that everyone is responsible for prevention, irrespective of their HIV status. The framework calls for ending stigma, discrimination and unjust criminalisation that violate human rights and deter people living from HIV from accessing HIV prevention, treatment and care services.

4. The UNAIDS Fast-Track approach and the 2016 United Nations Political Declaration on Ending AIDS lay out recommendations that address the primary prevention and structural changes required to reach everyone affected and to provide accessible and affordable treatment for all people living with HIV.

5. Male and female condoms and other combination prevention strategies remain a key part of the HIV response as primary prevention tools. Stronger condom programming is essential to ensure sexual and reproductive health in general, not just HIV.

 

World on way to ‘generation free of AIDS’, UN chief Ban Ki-moon says

ABC News, 14 July, 2015

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says the world is headed for a “generation free of AIDS”, after UNAIDS reported a 35 per cent drop in new HIV infections from 15 years ago.

However, the UN warned that continuing stigmatisation of sex workers, drug users and homosexuals were barriers to progress.

Read more here