STIs in remote Australia

ABC Health Report, Monday 18 March 2019 5:45 PM

Leading Aboriginal researcher Associate Professor James Ward* is calling for action in remote Australia to deal with a preventable epidemic of sexually transmissible infections — including syphilis — in a population that’s no more sexually active than non-Indigenous people of the same age.  

He joined Dr Norman Swan’s Health Report on ABC RN.

Later this month James will present to the National Rural Health Conference about addressing sexually transmitted infections in remote Australia.

*James Ward is Associate Professor, Flinders University; & Head of Infectious Diseases Research, Aboriginal Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute. 

 

 

Update on Sexually Transmitted Infections: forum recording now available

SHINE SA, 17/1/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of sexually transmitted infections. This recording is available free of charge, and access is limited to three months only.

This forum covers current trends in sexually transmitted infections and includes recent updates to the Australian STI Management Guidelines for Use in Primary Care.

Presenter: Dr Tonia Mezzini, Sexual Health Physician.

Recording length: 1 hour 25 minutes.

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum.

To watch the recording click here and sign in – or set up a new account at https://shinesa.trainingvc.com.au/Under ‘Course Categories’ click Clinical Education to find the course STI Update, and then click Enrol Me.

 

Prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomonas in Aboriginal Australians

Prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomonas in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Sexual Health – http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/SH15171, Submitted: 25 August 2015  Accepted: 5 November 2015   Published online: 18 January 2016

Abstract:

Higher notification rates of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) are reported among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Aboriginal) compared with non-Aboriginal people in Australia.

The aim of this study is to estimate the pooled prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomonas among Aboriginal people in Australia by sex, age-group, setting (clinic vs population/community-based) and population group [adults, pregnant females, young people (12–29 years) and prisoners].

The databases Medline, PubMed and Web of Science were searched in May 2015. A meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the pooled prevalence of the four STIs in Aboriginal people and if possible, by gender, age-group, setting and population group. A total of 46 studies were included.

The pooled prevalence was 11.2% (95%CI: 9.4–13.0%) for chlamydia (36 studies), 12.5% (95%CI: 10.5–14.6%) for gonorrhoea (28 studies), 16.8% (95%CI: 11.0–22.6%) for syphilis (13 studies) and 22.6% (95%CI: 18.5–26.7%) for trichomonas (11 studies); however, there was significant heterogeneity between studies (I2 <97.5%, P < 0.01).

In the subgroup analysis, a higher pooled prevalence occurred in females than males for chlamydia (12.7% vs 7.7%) and gonorrhoea (10.7% vs 8.1%). The prevalence of chlamydia was 12.4% in clinic-based compared with 4.3% in population-based studies. The highest pooled prevalence by population group was among pregnant females (16.8%) and young people (16.2%) for chlamydia, pregnant females (25.2%) for trichomonas; and young people for gonorrhoea (11.9%).

This review highlights the need to decrease the prevalence of STIs among Aboriginal people through community-based programs that target asymptomatic young people.

Note: This is the abstract only, as the full text is via paid subscription only.  For full text access, please see your librarian or pay direct via journal website.