Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV: An overview for Health Professionals

SHINE SA, October 2018

Access to PEP after an eligible exposure to HIV is a medical emergency. Your response to patients presenting for PEP can support them in preventing a life-long infection with HIV.

A brief, online training module has been created to support health professionals to:

• Increase your understanding of PEP as an emergency presentation and vital HIV prevention measure
• Assist you in providing patients with optimal care and support when seeking PEP in the emergency setting

This course is designed for Medical Officers and Registered Nurses in hospital emergency departments and targeted primary care clinical and rural sites that hold PEP starter packs in South Australia.

  • To register for the free PEP training module, please email us here with your name, position and workplace.

SA Health has contributed funds towards this program.

PEP after Non-Occupational and Occupational Exposure to HIV: Australian Guidelines revised

Our apologies to those who tried to access SASHA while it was down. The technical difficulties have now been resolved.

——————————————————————————————————————–

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, August 2016

The Second edition of the Post-Exposure Prophylaxis after Non-Occupational and Occupational Exposure to HIV: Australian National Guidelines is now available.

These guidelines outline the management of individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to HIV in non-occupational and occupational settings.

There are currently no data from randomised controlled trials of the use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and evidence for use has been extrapolated from animal data, mother to child transmission, occupational exposure and small prospective studies of PEP regimens in HIV-negative men. Accordingly, assumptions are made about the direction of management.

Every presentation for PEP should be assessed on a case-by-case basis, balancing the potential harms and benefits of treatment.

Recommendations following non-occupational exposure have been updated, and information about PEP in the context of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), PEP and children, renal disease, and gender identity and history has been added.

  • Download the revised guidelines (PDF) here
  • Updates to the supplementary documents, as well as a navigable website for the guidelines, will soon be available. At present, the 2013 literature review and checklist are still available, linked below:

    PEP Checklist (2013)

    Literature Review (2013)