Factsheet on the new The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017

The Equality Campaign, 18/09/2017

The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017 was introduced into parliament (and passed) at the end of last week. Included as a part of the bill was a series of temporary measures to protect people from vilification, harassment or threats of harm during the current postal survey campaign.

Also included as a part of the bill is a series of requirements in relation to campaign materials (including any form of external communication) and advertising, that are papplicable to any individual or organisation during the postal survey campaign period.

Measures and requirements that have been introduced into the bill are only applicable until the date in which the Australian Bureau of Statistics is due to announce the results of the Marriage Law Postal Survey, on 15 November 2017.

The attached fact sheet has been prepared by the Equality Campaign to assist stakeholders with activities for the upcoming campaign period. Included are the responsibilities and considerations that organisations need to review prior to distributing any material or communicating in any form that has the intent of encouraging participation in the Marriage Law Postal Survey or encouraging a vote one way or the other. The fact sheet contains essential information and new requirements that are applicable for the next eight weeks. Please note that these provisions took effect from Thursday 14 September 2017.

‘Revenge porn’: one in five report they have been victims in Australian survey

Guardian, Monday 8 May 2017

The first comprehensive research on so-called revenge porn has shed light on the “mass scale of victimisation” across Australia and its sometimes devastating impact.

A survey of nearly 4,300 people led by RMIT University and Monash University revealed that 20% of respondents had had images or videos of a nude or sexual nature taken without their consent; 11% had had them share, and 9% had received threats that images of themselves would be shared.

Men and women were equally likely to be victims but the rate was higher among younger people: one in three teenagers aged 16 to 19 and one in four aged 20 to 29 reported at least one form of image victimisation. Marginalised groups – Indigenous and gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians, and those with a disability – were especially vulnerable.

 

Stepping Stones: Legal barriers to economic equality after family violence

Women’s Legal Service Victoria, Melbourne , 2015

From Executive Summary:

Legal and economic problems arise from family violence which result in serious financial hardship for women and, at present, there are no accessible legal remedies to these problems.

We have researched the problems in the Stepping Stones project. This report contains the findings of the project and recommendations for solutions.
In interviews with women, we explored the consequences of family violence on women’s financial circumstances. We specifically directed our attention to systemic barriers women faced in their economic recovery.”

Download report (PDF) here