Towards a Safe Place: Raising Awareness of Domestic Violence in LGBTIQA+ Communities (resource)

Catalyst Foundation, 2019

The Towards a Safe Place project has created resources for LGBTIQA+ communities to use both as individuals or in communities to support and inform at risk individuals of available services and supports in relation to Domestic Violence and to increase awareness and understanding of Domestic Violence and its impact within LGBTIQA+ communities.

We have worked closely with LGBTIQA+ communities to develop these resources and are thankful for the help and support of our Reference Group comprising individuals, community organisations and service providers who have helped us in the development of these resources.

We hope the resources are used to inform and support at risk individuals and the wider community on LGBTIQA+ specific Domestic Violence and that service providers use the resources to continually develop and improve service responses and avenues for reporting domestic violence.

Training in culturally appropriate LGBTIQA+ domestic violence service delivery and response strategies is available and has been developed in partnership with Uniting Communities Adelaide’s Bfriend Project and a local LGBTIQA+ social group Pride of the South. If your organisation would like information on the training please contact us on (08) 81688700 or by email 

The project was supported by South Australian Government Attorney-General’s  Department, Bfriend (Uniting Communities) and Pride of the South.

Resources to download:

 

When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

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‘My mob is telling their story and it makes me feel good’: here’s what Aboriginal survivors of child sexual abuse told us they need

The Conversation, October 22, 2019 6.00am AEDT

There are an estimated 60,000 survivors of institutional child sexual abuse in Australia. Based on the private sessions held as part of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, 15% of survivors are Aboriginal. That suggests an estimated 9,000 Aboriginal survivors. This is likely an under estimation.

Not only do Aboriginal survivors experience the trauma of institutional child sexual abuse, if they were part of the Stolen Generations, they also experience the cultural trauma from being forcibly removed from family as children because they were Aboriginal. These children were denied connection to community, country, spirituality, language and culture.

This context and its impacts today, including ongoing disadvantage and systemic racism, needs to be understood in developing healing solutions for Aboriginal survivors.

Social housing landlords use domestic violence as reason to evict victims – study

Guardian Australia, Thu 13 Jun 2019 

Social housing landlords are evicting low-income domestic violence survivors because the abuse they suffer can be considered a “nuisance” breach under existing tenancy laws, a new study has found.

Researchers from two universities analysed lease terminations data, nearly 100 state tribunal and court decisions, as well as case studies from housing providers to assess the impact on the nation’s most vulnerable tenants.

 

Cervical cancer self-tests helping to break down barriers and increase screening rates

ABC Health & Wellbeing, Posted Friday 8th March 2019 at 14:54

In Australia, 80 per cent of cervical cancers are found in women who are overdue for screening or have never been screened.

“We know there’s an equity issue in our cervical screening program,” said Dr Saville, executive director of the VCS Foundation, a cervical screening not-for-profit.

“Women from lower socio-economic settings, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds do not screen as often … and are more likely to get cancer.”

In a bid to overcome these barriers, a self-testing process was introduced to Australia’s National Cervical Screening Program in 2017.

New Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics Directory

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 19 December 2018

For the first time, sources of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics have been collated into a central directory by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The new ‘Directory of Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics’ aims to improve the awareness and utilisation of family, domestic, and sexual violence statistics by providing an integrated repository of national and state and territory data sources.