Disability Support Toolkit for frontline workers – violence and abuse

1800RESPECT, March 2020

The Disability Support Toolkit has resources for front line workers supporting people with disability who have been impacted by violence and abuse.

People with disability are 1.8 times more likely to experience violence and abuse, including more varied forms of abuse. (Source: AIHW Report 2019.) They are also less likely, and take longer to reach out for support.

This Toolkit includes:

  • Research paper on best practice to implement the disability toolkit
  • Videos to share with clients on how to contact the 1800RESPECT service and how the service works
  • Easy English booklets that can be downloaded or ordered free from 1800RESPECT.

This Toolkit can be used in conjunction with information provided on our website on Inclusive Practice: Supporting people with disability.

‘Putting it into practice’ Guidelines

The ‘Putting it into Practice’ guidelines are a resource to support access and inclusion. The guidelines provide information on:

  • General principles
  • Engaging women with disabilities, including language
  • Using specialist resources

 

  • Download the guidelines in Word or PDF.

Scope Videos

This set of 3 videos were co-developed by Scope and 1800RESPECT. They are designed to be viewed by people with disability, and include information on how to contact 1800RESPECT, and how the service works.

  • Watch the videos here

Easy English booklets

The Easy English booklets have been developed as part of the Disability Pathways Project and with Women with Disabilities Australia. They are evidence based, user group tested and easy to use.

Sunny app

Sunny is 1800RESPECT’s app for women with disability who have experienced violence and abuse. Sunny has been co-designed with women with disability to make sure it provides the very best support for the people who use it. Learn more about Sunny. Sunny is free to download and is free to use on your phone.

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Women on temporary visas experiencing family violence face additional complex barriers to seeking help

inTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence, March 11th, 2020

CEO of inTouch, Ms Michal Morris, today released a position paper on women on temporary visas who are experiencing family violence. The paper urges the government to implement eight recommendations in order to improve supports and services for these vulnerable women.

‘I believe that all women who experience family violence in Australia should have access to the full suite of support services and be safe. Visa status should not be a factor, nor should living in destitution. Today, the government is issuing more temporary visas than ever before. Because of this we are only going to see more women in need and more gaps in services’, said Ms Morris.

Snapshot of mental health and suicide prevention statistics for LGBTI people

The National LGBTI Health Alliance (The Alliance), February 2020

Although many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) Australians live healthy and happy lives, research has demonstrated that a disproportionate number experience poorer mental health outcomes and have higher risk of suicidal behaviours than their peers.

These health outcomes are directly related to experiences of stigma, prejudice, discrimination and abuse on the basis of being LGBTI. This document aims to provide a snapshot of what is known of the current mental health and wellbeing outcomes of LGBTI people in Australia.

SHINE SA Media Release: World AIDS Day – Every Journey Counts

World AIDS Day is marked on 1 December each year, to raise awareness across the world and in the community about the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS. It is a day to show support for people living with HIV and to commemorate loved ones who we have lost to the epidemic.

The day also aims to encourage Australians to educate themselves and others about HIV and to ensure that people living with HIV can participate fully in the life of the community, free from stigma and discrimination.

HIV still exists in Australia and can affect anyone. While there is still no vaccine or cure for HIV, there are now highly effective treatments and prevention options. People with HIV can take medications on a daily basis to maintain their HIV at an undetectable level and to keep them healthy. Today, HIV is considered a chronic but manageable condition, and people with HIV can lead long and healthy lives, with a similar life expectancy to a person who does not have HIV.

Natasha Miliotis, SHINE SA’s Chief Executive Officer said that:

“Like many other conditions, HIV can be prevented. By being informed about what HIV is and how it can be transmitted, we can take measures to look after ourselves and others.”

SHINE SA encourages people looking to test for or talk about HIV to visit one of our clinics, or contact SAMESH, a collaborative program of Thorne Harbour Health and SHINE SA.

You can show your support for people with HIV on World AIDS Day by wearing a red ribbon, the international symbol of HIV awareness and support. You can also find a World AIDS Day event near you by visiting www.worldaidsday.org.au.

To read SHINE SA’s Fact Sheet on HIV visit: www.shinesa.org.au/health-information/sexually-transmitted-infections/hiv/

For further information and media enquiries contact Tracey Hutt, Director Workforce Education and Development 

Press release: We Must Do Better for Our Trans and Gender Diverse Children and Young People

South Australia’s first Commissioner for Children and Young People, 4th November 2019

Commissioner for Children and Young People Helen Connolly says that South  Australia’s trans and gender diverse children and young people have told her they want their health care needs to be a  priority for the Government. 

Our jurisdictions around Australia already deliver models of care that cater to the specific needs of trans and gender diverse children and young people, however South Australia is lagging behind with children and young people, and their families consistently report that access and support is ‘ad hoc’.

The findings have come out of the First Port of Call report released by the Commissioner. On advice received from trans and gender diverse children and young
people, four distinct priority areas, requiring immediate attention, have been identified in the report.

 

When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

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