Tough man stereotype can hurt women and men: report

Our Watch, November 2019

Men who conform only to rigid stereotypes of how to be a man are more likely to have sexist attitudes and behaviours, which in turn makes them more likely to perpetuate violence against women, according to a new report by Our Watch and the Victorian Office for Women.

The landmark study, Men in focus, is an extensive review of Australian and international research evidence on the topic, which aims to build a deeper understanding of masculinity, as well as providing guidance for those working with men and boys to prevent violence against women.

Australia’s health 2018 (Report)

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,  Release Date: 

 

Australia’s Health 2018 is the AIHW’s 16th biennial report on the health of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots.

The report also summarises the performance of the health system against an agreed set of indicators.

Australia’s health 2018: in brief is a companion report to Australia’s health 2018.

Table of contents:

Whole report:

PDF Report (17.3Mb)

Australia’s health 2018 in brief:

Companion ‘in brief’ booklet presents highlights in a compact easy-to-use format.

 

Pregnant women are at increased risk of domestic violence in all cultural groups

The Conversation, April 26, 2018 6.00pm AEST

Domestic violence occurs across all age groups and life stages. Rather than reducing during pregnancy, expecting a child is a key risk factor for domestic violence beginning or escalating.

Our research, published today in the journal BMJ Open, found that 4.3% of pregnant women due to give birth in Western Sydney disclosed domestic violence when asked about it by a midwife at her first hospital visit. The study examined more than 33,000 ethnically diverse women who gave birth between 2006 and 2016, and found that these disclosures spanned all cultural groups.

Using Chosen Names Reduces Odds of Depression and Suicide in Transgender Youths

The University of Texas at Austin, Tue, April 3, 2018

In one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers led by a team at The University of Texas at Austin have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.     

“Many kids who are transgender have chosen a name that is different than the one that they were given at birth,” said author Stephen T. Russell, professor and chair of human development and family science. “We showed that the more contexts or settings where they were able to use their preferred name, the stronger their mental health was.”

 

SA Govt funds SHINE SA for more mental health support for the LGBTIQ community during marriage equality survey

Ian Hunter MLC, September 16, 2017

The State Government will provide extra mental health and counselling services for the LGBTIQ community due to expected increases in demand while the marriage equality postal survey is conducted.

According to beyondblue, LGBTI Australians have an increased risk of depression, anxiety, self-harming and suicidal thoughts. And they are twice as likely to suffer physical, verbal and emotional abuse.

There is widespread concern throughout the community that these issues will be exacerbated, particularly among young LGBTIQ people, as the nation debates changes to the Marriage Act.

In response, the South Australian Government is providing a one-off payment of $100,000 to SHINE SA to deliver extra services to the LGBTIQ community throughout South Australia.

SHINE SA is the lead agency for health and wellbeing services to the LGBTIQ community in South Australia. With Rainbow Tick accreditation and the state licence to provide HOW2 training for inclusive services, SHINE SA will utilise its strong networks with the LGBTIQ community to provide face-to-face, telephone and online services to people experiencing emotional and mental health issues over the coming months.

Dedicated telephone outreach services for LGBTIQ South Australians living in remote and regional areas that face the additional challenges of distance and isolation will also be provided.

Summary of results: Trans Pathways: the mental health experiences and care pathways of trans young people

Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, September 1, 2017

Trans Pathways is the largest study ever conducted of the mental health and care pathways of trans and gender diverse young people in Australia (859 participants). It is also the first Australian study to incorporate the views of parents and guardians of trans young people (194 participants).

What did Trans Pathways tell us?

  • Trans young people are at very high risk for poor mental health, self-harming and suicide attempts
  • Trans young people found it difficult to access health services
  • Many trans young people have experienced negative situations that affect their mental health such as peer rejection, bullying, issues with school, university or TAFE, and a lack of family support
  • Participants told us they used music and art, peers and friends, activism, social media and pets to make themselves feel better and take care of their mental wellbeing

The authors have provided a list of recommendations for governments and health providers, as well as guidance for schools, parents, peers and young trans people.

Download report:

If you or anyone you know needs help: