SA drug bill risks another Stolen Gen: Aboriginal Health Council

InDaily, March 21st, 2018

The head of South Australia’s peak Aboriginal health body has warned that a State Government plan to enforce mandatory drug treatment on young people risks dispossessing Aboriginal children of their culture.

Aboriginal Health Council state branch CEO Shane Mohor has joined a growing chorus of social service and health bodies that have criticised the Controlled Substance (Youth Treatment Orders) Amendment Bill currently before state parliament.

Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

Identifying and Plugging the Leaks: Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

CTAC (Canadian Treatment Action Council), 2018

This project explored what issues impact engagement by people living with HIV with healthcare in Ontario. The goal was to identify policy issues that impact treatment access for people living with HIV, and to identify opportunities to make the healthcare system more accessible.

The HIV Cascade of Care is a useful description of the different steps that a person living with HIV will need to take in order to achieve an undetectable viral load and optimal health outcomes, from infection and diagnosis through to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) initiation and viral suppression.

We know people drop out of the HIV Cascade of Care – e.g. why those starting treatment don’t stay on it. By seeking out policy barriers and developing solutions we can enable people to live long, healthy, and happy lives.

The project has five recommendations around barriers to engagement in the HIV Cascade of Care.

Download report here

 

Indigenous Risk Impact Screen Training – Upcoming Dates

Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia (DASSA), August 2018

DASSA’s Aboriginal Workforce Development team would like to invite you to attend the 2-day Indigenous Risk Impact Screen training workshop.

The Indigenous Risk Impact Screen is a validated culturally appropriate and widely used tool for screening substance use and mental disorders in Aboriginal clients. It has been developed in partnership with Aboriginal communities and is used throughout Australia. The purpose of the training is to provide participants with the skills to screen, assess and deliver these clients, a brief intervention that is culturally secure. The workshop includes training in the use of the IRIS screening instrument, a two factor screen that assesses alcohol and other drugs and associated mental health issues.

The target audience is people working in the health and community sector who have contact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients who may have emotional health and/or alcohol and other drug issues.

The training is free to attend. Sessions will be held in Adelaide (booked out), Ceduna, Coober Pedy & Mount Gambier. Please see attached promotional document for details with date and venue.

National LGBT Survey: Research report [UK]

Government Equalities Office, July 2018

The Government Equalities Office launched a national LGBT survey in July 2017 in order to develop a better understanding of the lived experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, and people who identify as having any other minority sexual orientation or gender identity, or as intersex.

The survey was open for 12 weeks and received 108,100 valid responses through an
anonymous online questionnaire that collected the experiences and views of
individuals who self-identified as having a minority sexual orientation or gender
identity, or as intersex, and were aged 16 or above and living in the UK. The survey placed an emphasis on issues relating to personal safety, education, the
workplace and healthcare. These were selected because existing evidence on the
experiences of LGBT people and their life outcomes tells us that these are the main
areas in which inequalities exist.

 

 

Language matters when working with people who use alcohol and other drugs…

Network of Alcohol & other Drugs Agencies (NADA) and the NSW Users and AIDS Association (NUAA), 

Language is powerful—especially when discussing alcohol and other drugs
and the people who use them.

A new resource from the Network of Alcohol & other Drugs Agencies (NADA) and the NSW Users and AIDS Association (NUAA) has been launched

Stigmatising language reinforces negative stereotypes. Person-centred language focuses on the person, not their substance use. It is a simple and effective way of showing you respect a person’s agency, dignity and worth.

This resource has been developed for people working in non government alcohol and other drugs (AOD) services. It has been developed in consultation with people who use drugs.The purpose of this resource is to provide workers with guidelines on how to use language to empower clients and reinforce a person-centred approach.

 

Centacare Drug and Alcohol Service – LGBTIQ Services

Centacare, 2018

Centacare Drug and Alcohol Service LGBTIQ Services  provide alcohol and other drug counselling and in-home detox for individuals who are LGBTIQ and their identified supports.

A free service for ages 10 years and over.

The team includes an LGBTIQ Peer Worker, Counsellors, a Lived Experience Worker and a Registered Nurse.

CDAS is a safe and inclusive service for the LGBTIQ community.

Download flyer or brochure for more information: