Advertising (in)equality: the impacts of sexist advertising on women’s health and wellbeing

Women’s Health Victoria, Issues Paper No. 14, December 2018

 

The aim of this issues paper is to provide an overview of significant literature

currently published on the nature of gender portrayals in advertising, and the

impacts of these representations on women’s health and wellbeing, gender

inequality and attitudes and behaviours that support violence against women.

 

This issues paper found that the continued use of gender stereotypes

and increasing reliance on images that sexualise and objectify women in

advertisements undermines efforts to promote gender equality in Australia.

Gender-stereotyped portrayals limit the aspirations, expectations, interests and

participation of women and men in our society. These portrayals are associated

with a range of negative health and wellbeing outcomes and are highly

problematic for the prevention of family violence and other forms of violence

against women.

 

The studies cited in this paper demonstrate that there is a clear business

case for change. Brands, businesses and creative agencies can benefit from

portraying both women and men proportionately, respectfully and realistically.

 

It’s hard to think about, but frail older women in nursing homes get sexually abused too

The Conversation, November 22, 2018 6.02am AEDT

We don’t often think of older women being victims of sexual assault, but such assaults occur in many settings and circumstances, including in nursing homes. Our research, published this week in the journal Legal Medicine, analysed 28 forensic medical examinations of female nursing home residents who had allegedly been victims of sexual assault in Victoria over a 15-year period.

The majority of the alleged victims had some form of cognitive or physical impairment. All 14 perpetrators who were reported were male, half of whom were staff and half other residents.

 

 

Connecting country: busting myths about Indigenous Australians (podcast)

Diversity Council of Australia, 2 Oct 2018

This 20-minute episode doesn’t just feature a beautiful Welcome to Country, but also attempts to connect Country by exploring the cultural and professional gaps that exist for Indigenous Australians at work and asking: where do these issues come from? Why do they persist? And what can we do to finally close the gap?

Helping answer these questions is Linda Burney – the first Aboriginal woman to serve in the House of Representatives, and the first Aboriginal person to serve in the NSW Parliament – as well as Karen Mundine, CEO at Reconciliation Australia.

Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Produced and written by: Andrea Maltman Rivera. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese. Contributions from: Catherine Petterson and Simone Empacher Earl. Special thanks to Audiocraft. Welcome to Country by Aunty Norma Ingram.peer

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners are warned.  The following podcast may contain voices of deceased people.

Sex a key part of life for people over 65, study says

Substance misuse – the gender divide explained

Alcohol and Drug Foundation, February 21, 2018

Men generally consume harmful substances at higher rates than women – this is true both within Australia and internationally. But while the research points to the prevalence of substance misuse disorders among women in Australia as being around half that of men, they are more likely to be socially criticised as a result of their use/misuse.

This criticism stems from the continuation of traditional gender-based roles assigned to women within our society, which in turn generates and perpetuates social and institutional stigma. One of the end results of this is a reduction in women seeking out treatment services for alcohol and other drug-related (AOD) issues. Which, in turn, has reduced the opportunity for research into many of the gender-specific factors that drive women’s AOD misuse, as well as reducing the quality and efficacy of AOD treatment services for them.

Purruna Miyurna 2-day health summit for ATSI students

SHINE SA, 25.5.2017

PURRUNA MIYURNA: Healthy People

Presented by SHINE SA’s Yarning On program, Purruna Miyurna is a 2-day health
summit for ATSI students in years 9–12 in high schools and education programs
within southern Adelaide.

This interactive and hands-on summit will cover:
• Respectful relationships
• Domestic violence
• Sexual health
• Self-worth and cultural identity

The objective of the summit is to provide an opportunity for our students to gain
information and understanding on the topic of “Healthy Relationships”, what a
healthy relationship looks like, feels like and sounds like.
The summit will be culturally safe and LGBTIQ inclusive.

Our aim is to start a conversation among our young people, educate and
share information in order to break down barriers and challenge the perceived
stereotypes/ideas of Aboriginal people in relationships.

The summit will include ActNow Theatre presenting “Speak out”. This is an interactive theatre performance tackling homophobia in high schools. Presented by young professional actors and a facilitator, “Speak Out” explores various forms of homophobia and the effect it has, while providing opportunities and a safe space to develop strategies to respond to homophobia.

Local Kaurna Narrunga man Jack Buckskin will also be presenting during the summit, facilitating a cultural identity workshop, strengthening the cultural knowledge of our Aboriginal young people and their understanding of cultural identity and self-respect.

COST: $50 per student, includes a summit shirt, catering and an information bag

VENUE: Hopgood Theatre, Ramsay Place, Noarlunga Centre

REGISTRATION: Go to: www.shinesa.org.au/events/purruna-miyurna/
Limited spaces available. Registration closes 1 June 2017.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Jessica Wishart, SHINE SA, 8300 5344
15–16 JUNE 2017

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Download flyer (PDF): Health Summit Purruna Miyurna