Sexual Diversity in Aboriginal Sexual Health (video)

Young Deadly Free, September 2019

Experiences and tips for health workers when working in sexual health with the LGBTIQ community.

This video goes for 10 minutes & 50 seconds.

Learn more at http://youngdeadlyfree.org.au/ or https://www.facebook.com/youngdeadlyfree/

  • Watch video embedded below or on YouTube here

Advertising (in)equality: the impacts of sexist advertising on women’s health and wellbeing

Women’s Health Victoria, Issues Paper No. 14, December 2018

 

The aim of this issues paper is to provide an overview of significant literature

currently published on the nature of gender portrayals in advertising, and the

impacts of these representations on women’s health and wellbeing, gender

inequality and attitudes and behaviours that support violence against women.

 

This issues paper found that the continued use of gender stereotypes

and increasing reliance on images that sexualise and objectify women in

advertisements undermines efforts to promote gender equality in Australia.

Gender-stereotyped portrayals limit the aspirations, expectations, interests and

participation of women and men in our society. These portrayals are associated

with a range of negative health and wellbeing outcomes and are highly

problematic for the prevention of family violence and other forms of violence

against women.

 

The studies cited in this paper demonstrate that there is a clear business

case for change. Brands, businesses and creative agencies can benefit from

portraying both women and men proportionately, respectfully and realistically.

 

It’s hard to think about, but frail older women in nursing homes get sexually abused too

The Conversation, November 22, 2018 6.02am AEDT

We don’t often think of older women being victims of sexual assault, but such assaults occur in many settings and circumstances, including in nursing homes. Our research, published this week in the journal Legal Medicine, analysed 28 forensic medical examinations of female nursing home residents who had allegedly been victims of sexual assault in Victoria over a 15-year period.

The majority of the alleged victims had some form of cognitive or physical impairment. All 14 perpetrators who were reported were male, half of whom were staff and half other residents.

 

 

Connecting country: busting myths about Indigenous Australians (podcast)

Diversity Council of Australia, 2 Oct 2018

This 20-minute episode doesn’t just feature a beautiful Welcome to Country, but also attempts to connect Country by exploring the cultural and professional gaps that exist for Indigenous Australians at work and asking: where do these issues come from? Why do they persist? And what can we do to finally close the gap?

Helping answer these questions is Linda Burney – the first Aboriginal woman to serve in the House of Representatives, and the first Aboriginal person to serve in the NSW Parliament – as well as Karen Mundine, CEO at Reconciliation Australia.

Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Produced and written by: Andrea Maltman Rivera. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese. Contributions from: Catherine Petterson and Simone Empacher Earl. Special thanks to Audiocraft. Welcome to Country by Aunty Norma Ingram.peer

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners are warned.  The following podcast may contain voices of deceased people.

Sex a key part of life for people over 65, study says

Substance misuse – the gender divide explained

Alcohol and Drug Foundation, February 21, 2018

Men generally consume harmful substances at higher rates than women – this is true both within Australia and internationally. But while the research points to the prevalence of substance misuse disorders among women in Australia as being around half that of men, they are more likely to be socially criticised as a result of their use/misuse.

This criticism stems from the continuation of traditional gender-based roles assigned to women within our society, which in turn generates and perpetuates social and institutional stigma. One of the end results of this is a reduction in women seeking out treatment services for alcohol and other drug-related (AOD) issues. Which, in turn, has reduced the opportunity for research into many of the gender-specific factors that drive women’s AOD misuse, as well as reducing the quality and efficacy of AOD treatment services for them.