Snapshot of mental health and suicide prevention statistics for LGBTI people

The National LGBTI Health Alliance (The Alliance), February 2020

Although many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) Australians live healthy and happy lives, research has demonstrated that a disproportionate number experience poorer mental health outcomes and have higher risk of suicidal behaviours than their peers.

These health outcomes are directly related to experiences of stigma, prejudice, discrimination and abuse on the basis of being LGBTI. This document aims to provide a snapshot of what is known of the current mental health and wellbeing outcomes of LGBTI people in Australia.

Closing the Gap report 2020 shows only two targets on track

ABC, 12/02/2020

The 12th Closing the Gap report, tabled in Parliament today, shows Aboriginal children still trail far behind non-Indigenous children in literacy, numeracy and writing skills.

The report also shows the country is on track to meet just two of seven government targets to reduce the disparity in health, education and employment outcomes.

Gains in Indigenous health have been the same or smaller than those for non-Indigenous Australians — meaning gaps are persisting and, in the case of child mortality, widening. There has been no progress on a goal to close the life expectancy gap by 2031.

  • Read more of news article here
  • Read the report online here
  • Download full report PDF here

More than 6,500 same-sex marriages registered in 2018

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 27th November 2019

There were 119,188 marriages in Australia in 2018, including 6,538 same-sex marriages, according to data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

James Eynstone-Hinkins, Director of the ABS Health and Vital Statistics Section, said 2018 was the first full year in which same-sex couples could marry after changes to the Marriage Act in late 2017.

“In 2018, same-sex marriages represented 5.5 per cent of the total number of marriages and inclusion of these marriages has influenced some key statistics,” said Mr Eynstone-Hinkins.

“The median age at marriage recorded the greatest increase in more than a decade. This was largely because the median age of same-sex couples was considerably higher than that of opposite-sex couples.”

The median age of same-sex couples in 2018 was 44.9 years for males and 39.3 years for females (compared with 32.1 years for males and 30.2 years for females for opposite-sex couples).

Although more than one-third of same sex marriages occurred in NSW (35.0%), same-sex marriages accounted for only 5.6% of all NSW marriages. The jurisdiction with the highest proportion of same-sex marriages was the Australian Capital Territory at 8.3% of all marriages.

The data was released as part of Marriages and Divorces, Australia, 2018 which also showed that the most popular season to marry was spring (31.8 per cent of all marriages), and the most popular day to marry was Saturday 20 October, with 1,993 couples tying the knot.d

The information also showed that there were 49,404 divorces in Australia in 2018. The crude divorce rate was 2.0 divorces per 1,000 people in 2018, compared to 2.7 in 1998.

HIV diagnoses in Australia drop to lowest number in 18 years: report

Kirby Institute, July 3rd, 2019

Australia continues to lead the world in HIV prevention and in 2018 recorded the lowest number of HIV diagnoses since 2001.

According to a report released today by the Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney, last year there were 835 HIV diagnoses across the country, which represents a decline of 23% over five years.

The declines reported today are largely due to reductions in the number of HIV diagnoses that are reported as attributable to sex between men. Over the past five years, HIV diagnoses have reduced by 30% among this population.

The report reveals no declines among heterosexual populations, with new diagnoses relatively stable among this group.

Similarly, there have been no declines in HIV diagnoses among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

New report about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s experience of violence

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 19 February 2019

The extent of family and domestic violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women has been revealed in a new Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) report using previously unpublished data from the 2014-15 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey. 

ABS Director of the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, Debbie Goodwin said “Of those women who had experienced violence, more than two-thirds (72 per cent) identified an intimate partner or family member as a perpetrator in their most recent experience. This was twice the rate reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men (35 per cent).

New Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics Directory

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 19 December 2018

For the first time, sources of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics have been collated into a central directory by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The new ‘Directory of Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics’ aims to improve the awareness and utilisation of family, domestic, and sexual violence statistics by providing an integrated repository of national and state and territory data sources.