LGBTIQA+ Affirming Religious Communities in South Australia

Centacare, July 2020

The Centacare Rainbow Quality Team would like to provide you with a list of affirming religious communities (please see attachment via link below) that may be helpful for some people from the LGBTIQA+ community that you work with. 

Spiritual wellbeing is a human right, but unfortunately people within the Rainbow community who hold particular Christian faiths are not always awarded this human right within their own faith denominations.  In response to this need, the Centacare Rainbow Quality Team have worked on identifying religious communities within South Australia who are not just welcoming of people from the LGBTIQA+ community, but are affirming of them.

They have contacted individually the communities listed and have secured permission from them to be added to the list.  They have also identified individuals within each community that can be used as an entry point for people who wish to connect with these affirming communities.

The Team acknowledge that this is not an exhaustive list of affirming communities, and there may be others that they do not know of.  If you have additional contacts that you feel would be beneficial for this list, please let them know.  Also, if you have someone in need whom does not have a denomination listed, please let them know and they will endeavour to source a suitable community if available.  At this stage they have only identified Christian faith communities, but they do recognise that spiritual need extends well beyond this faith.  However, to date the contacts on this list is all that they have been able to identify, and they will continue to source affirming communities from other faith traditions. They can be contacted via the www.centacare.org.au/contact  website for any feedback or additional information.

Whilst the Team have gone to significant lengths to ensure the groundwork has been done to create a warm and welcoming entry into these affirming communities, they would also like to point out that they have no formal links with these communities and therefore cannot guarantee that all people will receive the support that they are looking for.  They also cannot offer support to maintain connection within these communities.

It is envisaged that this list will act as a guide for those seeking a supportive and affirming connection with a religious community that aligns with their spiritual beliefs and needs. The Centacare Rainbow Quality Team hope this list will assist you to support those with this particular need.

SIN Press release Re: Introduction of Statutes Amendment (Repeal of Sex Work Offenses) Bill 2020

SIN 18/06/2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Re: Introduction of Statutes Amendment (Repeal of Sex Work Offenses) Bill 2020

Today, Tammy Franks, MLC, will be speaking to a new bill that seeks to remove sex work from the SA criminal code. South Australia retains some of the most punitive and archaic sex industry laws in the country. This will be the fourteenth attempt at sex industry law reform in the state with a bill to decriminalise the industry being defeated by a narrow margin in the House of Assembly in November of 2019.

South Australia’s only completely peer based sex worker support organization, SIN, applauds attempts to decriminalise the industry. “Decriminalisation has been evidenced as the best legal framework for ALL sex workers in regard to health and safety”, says Kat Morrison, SIN General Manager. “Sex Industry law reform is long overdue is South Australia. What was once a progressive state that lead the way in inclusive and contemporary law reform now lags embarrassingly behind the times”.

Consensual commercial sexual services, as well as many activities and issues surrounding these transactions, are criminalised within the Summary Offenses Act, 1953 and the Criminal Consolidation Act, 1935. This bill seeks to repeal the inclusion of sex work in these Acts.

Baby born with “avoidable” congenital syphilis: experts

InDaily, June 04, 2020

The recent birth of a child in South Australia with congenital syphilis, despite the mother being previously diagnosed and treated for the sexually transmitted infection, has prompted SA Health concern about the quality of the treatment.

[A] public health alert [sent by SA Health] “reminds and advises health practitioners of their responsibilities” in managing syphilis cases and contacts.

General practitioner at not-for-profit sexual health service SHINE SA Amy Moten said the case was “significant” because it was an avoidable outcome.

SHINE SA media release: INTERNATIONAL SEX WORKERS DAY

SHINE SA, Posted on 

International Sex Workers Day on June 2 provides an opportunity for us to support the rights of sex workers in South Australia and advocate for the decriminalisation of sex work.

Sex work is criminalised in South Australia which means that those engaging in relevant sex work activities can be prosecuted for criminal offences. SIN, SIDAC (Sex Industry Decriminalisation Action Committee) and Scarlet Alliance (Australian Sex Workers Association) advocate for decriminalisation which is seen as a best practice model by sex workers and supportive community-based organisations.

The decriminalisation of sex work would improve the safety, sexual health, emotional wellbeing and financial security of sex workers. Whilst sex workers may be more vulnerable to assault and exploitation, research shows this vulnerability is impacted by the policing, stigma and lack of labor rights which current sex work laws encourage.[1]

In a recent statement SIDAC said:

“Sex work will always exist, but is up to us to determine and guarantee, the conditions and safety of those involved. South Australia must decriminalise the industry in the best interests of both sex workers and the broader community.”

On this International Sex Workers Day we continue to support the decriminalisation of sex work in South Australia and its potential for positive impacts on the human rights of sex workers and the health of sex workers and the general public.

 

NOTES: [1] Platt, L., Grenfell, P., Meiksin, R., Elmes, J., Sherman, S. G., Sanders, T., Mwangi, P., & Crago, A. L. (2018). Associations between sex work laws and sex workers’ health: A systematic review and meta-analysis of quantitative and qualitative studies. PLoS medicine15(12), e1002680. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002680Bottom of Form

 

SEXUAL HEALTH MATTERS: new clinical podcast from SHINE SA

SHINE SA, May 2020

Filled with quality clinical guidance and tips for best practice, SHINE SA’s new Sexual Health Matters – Clinical Podcast delves into the intimate regions of the body and broaches the uncomfortable conversations necessary to ensure client safety and sexual/reproductive well-being.

Through discussion, interview and explanation, experienced sexual health clinicians raise awareness of guidelines, resources, research and emerging trends to ensure that clinicians everywhere can provide excellent sexual and reproductive care to improve client outcomes.

If you have a topic you would like us to cover in future podcasts, email courses@shinesa.org.au to let us know!

New Resource for young LGBTIQA+ people

Victim Support Service, May 2020

The Rainbow Safety Guide is an informational wallet card that links LGBTIQ+ youth experiencing violence and abuse to online and phone resources. The Guide was made by and for LGBTIQ+ youth.


meet the artist/DESIGNER: India Potter (she/they is an Adelaide based young queer artist who does both digital and watercolour designs. Her art often portrays the queer community and aspects of LGBTIQ+ life. Both an artist and graphic designer, India created the art and designed the wallet card, taking special care to create art that was representative, colourful, but discreet enough that without the first page the Rainbow Safety Guide is less obviously a LGBTIQ+ resource.


This wallet sized Guide can be easily carried around by its user. It provides links to support services & information that may help them by:
• phone numbers
• online links
• QR codes

Due to the card’s small size it can be shared discreetly so as to not unintentionally “out” the recipient. If you are not in a position to physically give the card to someone, you can share this online link or our other LGBTIQ+ pages. The quick exit feature allows the reader to hide the page quickly if needed.

This wallet card will be valuable to services who work with youth, as well as individuals who know a young LGBTIQ+ person who they know or suspect is experiencing violence or abuse.

  • Read more at the VSS website here
  • To view or download the Rainbow Safety Guide card (PDF), click here
  • To request a physical copy email the VSS helpdesk at helpdesk@victimsa.org