The health and wellbeing of Australian lesbian, gay and bisexual people: a systematic assessment

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I04 June 2019

https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12855

Abstract

Objective: This study revisits disparities in health and wellbeing by sexual identity in Australia, identifying which domains demand priority policy intervention, documenting differences between gay/lesbian vs. bisexual populations, and examining change over time in the relative health and wellbeing of sexual minorities.

Method: I fitted multivariable ordinary least squares and random‐effect panel regression models on 20 outcomes to compare the health and wellbeing of heterosexual, gay/lesbian and bisexual people, using 2012/2016 data from a national probability sample – the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey.

Results: I found strong associations between sexual minority identities and most health and wellbeing outcomes. These were comparatively larger for: role‐emotional health, mental health and general health; bisexual compared to gay/lesbian people; and minority women compared to minority men. I found no change over time in the relative health and wellbeing outcomes of gay/lesbian people, but evidence of worsening circumstances among bisexual people.

Conclusion: There are important disparities in the health and wellbeing profiles of different sexual minority populations in Australia, based on sex (male vs. female), sexual identity (gay/lesbian vs. bisexual), and observation time (2012 vs. 2016).

Implications for public health: Sexual identity remains an important marker of risk for health and wellbeing outcomes within Australia, underscoring the importance of fully integrating sexual identity in health policy and practice.

OMID magazine for Afghan and Farsi speaking LGBT people

PEACE Multicultural Services, RASA, 2016

OMID is a new magazine for our Afghan and Farsi speaking friends around the world, who are same-sex attracted, trans-gendered or who are questioning their sexuality and/or gender. Whether you live in Australia, Afghanistan, Iran or anywhere else in the world, we hope that this magazine reaches you, provides you with valuable information and touches your heart. OMID (meaning hope), like a beacon of light at the end of a dark tunnel, is what keeps us going even in the toughest of times.”

OMID has a strong focus on health and well-being and is filled with stories, poems, personal experiences, film reviews and artworks. If you have a client, a friend or a family member that would like to contribute to the magazine in future or would like to know more about what PEACE Multicultural Services of Relationships Australia SA do and the support they offer, please email them on omid@rasa.org.au . The current issue is of OMID is November 2016.

  • Read, download or subscribe to issues of OMID here 

Annual Report of Trends in Behaviour: Viral hepatitis

UNSW Centre for Social Research in Health, October 2016

The Annual Report of Trends in Behaviour presents data from a selection of the behavioural and social research conducted by the Centre for Social Research in Health. The report focuses in particular on studies assessing trends over time or addressing emerging issues.

The Viral Hepatitis Supplement covers a few key issues which stand out  in relation to viral hepatitis.

 

 

Understanding expert views on defining & reaching heterosexually-identified MSM for health promotion & care

UNSW, July 2016

BRISE StraightMSM Study
Almost no published research exists specifically on heterosexually-identified men who have sex with men in Australia, and the international literature is also scant. Very little is known about the sexual practices, risk perceptions, or information and service needs of these men more broadly.
The proportion of heterosexually-identified men who have acquired HIV through
sex with men (and report this either as sex with a man, or ‘risk not further specified’) is unknown. This means that any specific needs or opportunities to tailor health
promotion and care to this sub-group are currently overlooked.
Funded by BRISE, the Centre for Social Research in Health, in collaboration with Pozhet and representatives of NSW Health sexual health services, conducted exploratory research to investigate the sexual practices, sexual spaces, sexual health knowledge and sexual health needs of these men, and to consider opportunities to better engage them with health promotion and care.
This report summarises the key outcomes of this pilot research, which comprised reviewing the literature, analysing existing survey data, appraising the terminology and activities evident in online personal ads posted by straight men who have sex with men, and conducting qualitative interviews with 30 professionals employed in health services, health promotion and other relevant roles in New South Wales.
Download report (PDF, 12 pages) here

 

 

New website to help teachers talk sex and gender with students

Educators NZ, September 23, 2015

RainbowYOUTH has launched a new website aimed to increase understanding and support of sex, gender and sexuality diversity within year 7-13 classrooms in New Zealand.

The website, Inside Out, contains free teaching resources, class guidelines and video content designed to ignite conversations.

The resource has been produced in a partnership between RainbowYOUTH, Curative, and CORE Education, and was further supported by the University of Auckland.

  • Read more here
  • Access the teaching resources here

‘I’m a bisexual homoromantic’: why young people are rejecting old labels

The Guardian, Wed 19th August 2015

A YouGov poll this week put the number of 18- to 24-year-old Brits who identify as entirely heterosexual at 46%, while just 6% would call themselves exclusively gay. Sexuality now falls between the lines: identity is more pliable, and fluidity more acceptable, than ever before.

Read more here