STI/BBV testing tool for asymptomatic people

NSW STI Programs Unit, ASHM & Qld. Govt.,  2019

This resource has charts and information about how routine STI/BBV testing can be offered, who to, and how to follow up.

Developed by NSW STI Programs Unit, NSW Australia, and reproduced with permission by the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, ASHM and Communicable Diseases Branch.

 

 

Update on Sexually Transmitted Infections: forum recording now available

SHINE SA, 17/1/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of sexually transmitted infections. This recording is available free of charge, and access is limited to three months only.

This forum covers current trends in sexually transmitted infections and includes recent updates to the Australian STI Management Guidelines for Use in Primary Care.

Presenter: Dr Tonia Mezzini, Sexual Health Physician.

Recording length: 1 hour 25 minutes.

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum.

To watch the recording click here and sign in – or set up a new account at https://shinesa.trainingvc.com.au/Under ‘Course Categories’ click Clinical Education to find the course STI Update, and then click Enrol Me.

 

STI/HIV testing tool for GPs and other primary care clinicians – updated

NSW STI Programs Unit, August 2017

The STI/HIV Testing Tool for GPs and other primary care clinicians has been updated. The tool shows how to:

• Offer routine STI/HIV testing in different consultations

• Conduct a brief risk assessment (sexual history)

• Conduct routine STI/HIV testing

• Conduct contact tracing

• Access available resources and additional support

Based on the Australian STI Management Guidelines, the tool has been developed by GPs with an interest in sexual health, sexual health and public health specialists. The tool is approved by peak bodies including the Royal Australian College of General Practice and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine.

Understanding expert views on defining & reaching heterosexually-identified MSM for health promotion & care

UNSW, July 2016

BRISE StraightMSM Study
Almost no published research exists specifically on heterosexually-identified men who have sex with men in Australia, and the international literature is also scant. Very little is known about the sexual practices, risk perceptions, or information and service needs of these men more broadly.
The proportion of heterosexually-identified men who have acquired HIV through
sex with men (and report this either as sex with a man, or ‘risk not further specified’) is unknown. This means that any specific needs or opportunities to tailor health
promotion and care to this sub-group are currently overlooked.
Funded by BRISE, the Centre for Social Research in Health, in collaboration with Pozhet and representatives of NSW Health sexual health services, conducted exploratory research to investigate the sexual practices, sexual spaces, sexual health knowledge and sexual health needs of these men, and to consider opportunities to better engage them with health promotion and care.
This report summarises the key outcomes of this pilot research, which comprised reviewing the literature, analysing existing survey data, appraising the terminology and activities evident in online personal ads posted by straight men who have sex with men, and conducting qualitative interviews with 30 professionals employed in health services, health promotion and other relevant roles in New South Wales.
Download report (PDF, 12 pages) here

 

 

LGB adults more likely to report impaired physical & mental health, substance use, due to discrimination stressors

JAMA Intern Med. Published online June 27, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.3432

New national data suggest lesbian, gay and bisexual adults were more likely to report impaired physical and mental health and heavy drinking and smoking, which may be the result of stressors they experience because of discrimination, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

The study objective was to compare health and health risk factors between LGB adults and heterosexual adults in the United States.

This study supports prior research finding substantial health disparities for LGB adults in the United States, potentially due to the stressors that LGB people experience as a result of interpersonal and structural discrimination. In screening for health issues, clinicians should be sensitive to the needs of sexual minority patients.

  • Access journal paper (free full text) here

Doctors’ assumptions on sex heighten lesbians’ cervical cancer risk

Reuters, Tue Feb 10, 2015 7:27pm EST

Lesbians may be at higher risk of cervical cancer because they get fewer screenings than heterosexual women, due partly to doctors’ sometimes incorrect assumptions about their sexual history, University of Washington researchers said on Tuesday.

Read more here