One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

Findings from the latest National Community Attitudes Towards Violence against Women Survey (NCAS)

ANROWS, May 2019

Findings from the 2017 National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey are now live. The survey collects information through telephone interviews with over 17,500 Australians 16 years of age and over.

Key findings:

Encouraging results
• Most Australians have accurate knowledge of violence against women and do not endorse this violence.
• Most Australians support gender equality and are more likely to support gender equality in 2017 than they were in 2013 and 2009.
• Australians are more likely to understand that violence against women involves more than just physical violence in 2017 than they were in 2013 and 2009.
• Australians are less likely to hold attitudes supportive of violence against women in 2017 than they were in 2013 and 2009.
• There has been improvement in knowledge and attitudes related to 27 of the 36 questions asked in 2013 and again in 2017.
• There has been improvement in knowledge and attitudes related to all but two of the 11 questions asked in the 1995 NCAS and again in 2017.
• If confronted by a male friend verbally abusing his female partner, most respondents say they would be bothered (98%), would act (70%) and would feel they would have the support of all or most of their friends if they did act (69%).

Concerning results
• There continues to be a decline in the number of Australians who understand that men are more likely than women to perpetrate domestic violence.
• A concerning proportion of Australians believe that gender inequality is exaggerated or no longer a problem.
• Among attitudes condoning violence against women, the highest level of agreement was with the idea that women use claims of violence to gain tactical advantage in their relationships with men.
• 1 in 5 Australians would not be bothered if a male friend told a sexist joke about women.

 

 

 

New Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics Directory

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 19 December 2018

For the first time, sources of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics have been collated into a central directory by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The new ‘Directory of Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics’ aims to improve the awareness and utilisation of family, domestic, and sexual violence statistics by providing an integrated repository of national and state and territory data sources.

Advertising (in)equality: the impacts of sexist advertising on women’s health and wellbeing

Women’s Health Victoria, Issues Paper No. 14, December 2018

 

The aim of this issues paper is to provide an overview of significant literature

currently published on the nature of gender portrayals in advertising, and the

impacts of these representations on women’s health and wellbeing, gender

inequality and attitudes and behaviours that support violence against women.

 

This issues paper found that the continued use of gender stereotypes

and increasing reliance on images that sexualise and objectify women in

advertisements undermines efforts to promote gender equality in Australia.

Gender-stereotyped portrayals limit the aspirations, expectations, interests and

participation of women and men in our society. These portrayals are associated

with a range of negative health and wellbeing outcomes and are highly

problematic for the prevention of family violence and other forms of violence

against women.

 

The studies cited in this paper demonstrate that there is a clear business

case for change. Brands, businesses and creative agencies can benefit from

portraying both women and men proportionately, respectfully and realistically.

 

Introducing Sunny, an app for women with disability to learn about violence and abuse

1800RESPECT, November 27, 2018

Introducing Sunny, an app for women with disability to learn about violence and abuse.

Sunny was co-designed by an expert group of women with disability, 1800RESPECT and Women with Disabilities Australia, to make sure it provides the very best support for the people who use it.

Sunny helps to:

  • understand what violence and abuse are
  • learn about different types of violence
  • tell your story
  • understand what has happened
  • know your rights
  • find people who can help

If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.

  • The Sunny app is free to download for iPhone and android phones and is available from the App store and Google Play. More information is available here.

Animation/GIF

Download for Facebook (1MB mp4)

Download for Twitter (500kb GIF)

Anj Barker Feature Overview video

Download here (Google Drive)

Instagram image

Sunny app square image

 

Facebook or Twitter image

Sunny horizontal image

Rules about sex: getting them right – upcoming training day

SHINE SA, September 2018

This stand-alone workshop introduces participants to a wide range of education resources that may be borrowed from SHINE SA and provides permanent access to an electronic resource on CD that can be applied immediately in the workplace.

The CD based resource has been produced to assist workers and carers to assess knowledge and teach rules about touch and sexual behaviour and strategies for sexual safety and improved relationships.

In this practical full-day module, you will be supported to apply the resource practically and ethically, using your own laptop.

The aims are to:
> reduce sexual victimisation of people with disability
> reduce the incidence of sexual behaviours which may cause offence to others
> prevent vulnerable people with a disability from involvement with the law and possible long-term consequences of this

Suitable participants include: developmental educators, service coordinators, special
education workers, therapists, disability advocates, police and parents.

Important: Please bring a laptop computer with a CD drive, installed with MS Word,
MS Powerpoint, or equivalent. An external plug-in mouse will be an advantage.

Details:
When – Monday 22 October 2018
Where – SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time – 9:30am – 4:30pm
Cost – $175