‘Sexism’ in sexual assault research, but this time men are the target

Science Daily, July 10, 2017

Sexism is alive and well, but this time men are the target. A new study debunks a long-standing theory that sexual assault isn’t as emotionally traumatizing for men as it is for women and that it doesn’t result in similar emotional impacts, especially depression. Men make up about 38 percent of sexual assault and rape incidents reported, and those in the military are particularly vulnerable and less likely to report an assault.

No excuses: government releases new guidelines on sexist language

The Age, April 10

“Boys will be boys.” “He’s picking on you because he likes you.” “Don’t throw like a girl.”

These are the kinds of phrases that the Australian government is attempting to eradicate with a new tool in its anti-violence campaign aimed at educators and influencers of young people.

  • Read more here 
  • Download No Excuses Guideline (PDF) here 

At what age are children aware of gender differences?

The Age, APRIL 6 2017 – 1:48PM

The Victorian government has announced it plans to teach its Respectful Relationship program to preschoolers as a way to target and prevent sexist behaviour among children aged three and four years old.

The justification for extending this program into preschool settings, according to the document released by the state government, is that “as young children learn about gender, they may also begin to enact sexist values, beliefs and attitudes that may contribute to disrespect and gender inequality”.

Read more here

 

 

Mission Australia’s Annual Youth Survey results, 2016

Mission Australia, December 2016

Each year Mission Australia encourages young Australians aged 15-19 to ‘speak up’ about the issues that really concern them through their annual Youth Survey, the largest of its kind. In 2016 they had close to 22,000 respondents.

Since its inception 15 years ago, the Youth Survey has become a critical piece of research and is used to inform the agendas of governments, policy makers and community organisations. The results can also be reported for specific locations or schools where there are enough respondents.

The Youth Survey 2016 showed that for the record number of 21,846 15 to 19 year olds who took part, alcohol and drugs and equity and discrimination were the top two issues facing Australia today, with mental health entering the top three for the first time in its 15 year history.

  • In the survey, young people continued to nominate coping with stress, school or study problems and body image as their top three issues of personal concern
  • 1 in 4 young people experienced unfair treatment or discrimination in the past year } due to gender, race/cultural background , or age.
  • 1 in 2 young people witnessed someone being unfairly treated or discriminated against due to race/cultural background, sexuality, and physical health or ability.
  • Of the four in ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who reported experiencing discrimination, MORE THAN HALF reported discrimination on the basis of race or cultural background.

There is a chapter in the report looking specifically at South Australian results in detail.

  • Download summary infographic (PDF) here
  • Read whole report (PDF) here 

Gender inequality is a problem, say 69% of young Australian women

The Guardian, Tuesday 11 October 2016

Like a recent report from the UK, a new report has found young Australian women also believe sexism to be preventing them from fulfilling their potential.

Plan International Australia and Our Watch surveyed 600 girls and young women aged between 15 and 19 on their inexperiences of inequality between December 2015 and February 2016.

Girls’ & Young Womens’ Attitudes Survey

Girlguiding, 2016

The Girlguiding charity has been asking girls what they think every year since 2009 through our Girls’ Attitudes Survey. They collect the views of over 1,600 girls and young women aged 7 to 21 across the UK. 

This year girls and young women reported that they feel held back by gender stereotypes, sexism, and anxiety about how they look. They think they may not achieve their aspirations because they don’t feel safe, they’re facing double standards on what behaviour is acceptable because they’re girls and they don’t feel the same roles are open to them compared to boys.

Themes of the report:

Girls and young women spoke about the challenges they’re facing and what they want to change in relation to:

Download full report here