Findings from the latest National Community Attitudes Towards Violence against Women Survey (NCAS)

ANROWS, May 2019

Findings from the 2017 National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey are now live. The survey collects information through telephone interviews with over 17,500 Australians 16 years of age and over.

Key findings:

Encouraging results
• Most Australians have accurate knowledge of violence against women and do not endorse this violence.
• Most Australians support gender equality and are more likely to support gender equality in 2017 than they were in 2013 and 2009.
• Australians are more likely to understand that violence against women involves more than just physical violence in 2017 than they were in 2013 and 2009.
• Australians are less likely to hold attitudes supportive of violence against women in 2017 than they were in 2013 and 2009.
• There has been improvement in knowledge and attitudes related to 27 of the 36 questions asked in 2013 and again in 2017.
• There has been improvement in knowledge and attitudes related to all but two of the 11 questions asked in the 1995 NCAS and again in 2017.
• If confronted by a male friend verbally abusing his female partner, most respondents say they would be bothered (98%), would act (70%) and would feel they would have the support of all or most of their friends if they did act (69%).

Concerning results
• There continues to be a decline in the number of Australians who understand that men are more likely than women to perpetrate domestic violence.
• A concerning proportion of Australians believe that gender inequality is exaggerated or no longer a problem.
• Among attitudes condoning violence against women, the highest level of agreement was with the idea that women use claims of violence to gain tactical advantage in their relationships with men.
• 1 in 5 Australians would not be bothered if a male friend told a sexist joke about women.

 

 

 

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Our Watch, July 18th 2018

Our Watch has today launched a resource aimed at tackling the horrific prevalence of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Changing the picture contains a set of clear actions that are needed to address the many drivers of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and is aimed at encouraging, guiding and supporting a national effort to prevent this violence.

Download report:

Report Changing the picture
Six-page executive summary
Background paper

Read more of article:

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

 

‘Sexism’ in sexual assault research, but this time men are the target

Science Daily, July 10, 2017

Sexism is alive and well, but this time men are the target. A new study debunks a long-standing theory that sexual assault isn’t as emotionally traumatizing for men as it is for women and that it doesn’t result in similar emotional impacts, especially depression. Men make up about 38 percent of sexual assault and rape incidents reported, and those in the military are particularly vulnerable and less likely to report an assault.

No excuses: government releases new guidelines on sexist language

The Age, April 10

“Boys will be boys.” “He’s picking on you because he likes you.” “Don’t throw like a girl.”

These are the kinds of phrases that the Australian government is attempting to eradicate with a new tool in its anti-violence campaign aimed at educators and influencers of young people.

  • Read more here 
  • Download No Excuses Guideline (PDF) here 

At what age are children aware of gender differences?

The Age, APRIL 6 2017 – 1:48PM

The Victorian government has announced it plans to teach its Respectful Relationship program to preschoolers as a way to target and prevent sexist behaviour among children aged three and four years old.

The justification for extending this program into preschool settings, according to the document released by the state government, is that “as young children learn about gender, they may also begin to enact sexist values, beliefs and attitudes that may contribute to disrespect and gender inequality”.

Read more here

 

 

Mission Australia’s Annual Youth Survey results, 2016

Mission Australia, December 2016

Each year Mission Australia encourages young Australians aged 15-19 to ‘speak up’ about the issues that really concern them through their annual Youth Survey, the largest of its kind. In 2016 they had close to 22,000 respondents.

Since its inception 15 years ago, the Youth Survey has become a critical piece of research and is used to inform the agendas of governments, policy makers and community organisations. The results can also be reported for specific locations or schools where there are enough respondents.

The Youth Survey 2016 showed that for the record number of 21,846 15 to 19 year olds who took part, alcohol and drugs and equity and discrimination were the top two issues facing Australia today, with mental health entering the top three for the first time in its 15 year history.

  • In the survey, young people continued to nominate coping with stress, school or study problems and body image as their top three issues of personal concern
  • 1 in 4 young people experienced unfair treatment or discrimination in the past year } due to gender, race/cultural background , or age.
  • 1 in 2 young people witnessed someone being unfairly treated or discriminated against due to race/cultural background, sexuality, and physical health or ability.
  • Of the four in ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who reported experiencing discrimination, MORE THAN HALF reported discrimination on the basis of race or cultural background.

There is a chapter in the report looking specifically at South Australian results in detail.

  • Download summary infographic (PDF) here
  • Read whole report (PDF) here