Decriminalisation of sex work in south Australia (SHINE SA Media Release)

SHINE SA,  

On 31 May 2019, the Sex Industry Network (SIN) will gather at Parliament House to rally for the decriminalisation of the South Australian sex industry and to recognise International Sex Workers Day.

In South Australia sex work is criminalised, prohibiting sex work so that those engaging in relevant activities can be prosecuted for criminal offences. SIN and Scarlet Alliance (Australian Sex Workers Association) advocate for decriminalisation which is seen as a best practice model by sex workers and community-based organisations.

In a recent statement SIN said:

“Sex work is skilled labour. We deserve the same industrial protections as any other worker in South Australia and, currently, what sets us apart is the criminalisation of the industry within which we CHOOSE to work.”

Natasha Miliotis, Chief Executive of SHINE SA said:

“We support the work of SIN and their advocacy for the decriminalisation of sex work in SA.

Amnesty International, the United Nations and the World Health Organization have all called for the full decriminalisation of consensual sex work as the scientific evidence is now clear – criminalisation itself leads to harm¹.

From a public health perspective decriminalisation is important to not only reduce stigma and discrimination, but to improve the health and safety of workers, clients and the broader community².”

For more information on SIN’s celebration of International Sex Workers Day and the rally for the decriminalisation of the South Australian sex industry visit www.sin.org.au.

For further information contact Tracey Hutt, Director Workforce Education and Development via email  or via telephone on 0434 937 036

 

 

¹ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30532209

² https://theconversation.com/new-report-shows-compelling-reasons-to-decriminalise-sex-work-83955

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Authors

Denton Callander, PhD,*† Hamish McManus, PhD,* Rebecca Guy, PhD,* Margaret Hellard, PhD,‡ Catherine C. O’Connor, DrPH,*§¶ Christopher K. Fairley, PhD,||** Eric P.F. Chow, PhD,||** Anna McNulty, MM,†† David A. Lewis, DA, PhD,‡‡§§ Christopher Carmody, MB, BS,¶¶ Heather-Marie A. Schmidt, PhD,|||| Jules Kim,*** and Basil Donovan, MD*††

From the *The Kirby Institute, †Centre for Social Research in Health,
UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW; ‡Burnet Institute, Melbourne, VIC;
§RPA Sexual Health Clinic, Community Health, Sydney Local Health
District; ¶Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW;
||Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health; **Central Clinical
School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash
University, Melbourne, VIC; ††Sydney Sexual Health Centre,
Sydney Hospital, Sydney; ‡‡Western Sydney Sexual Health Centre,
Parramatta; §§Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and
Biosecurity & Sydney Medical School-Westmead, University of
Sydney, Sydney; ¶¶Liverpool Sexual Health Centre, Liverpool; ||||
New South Wales Ministry of Health; and ***Scarlet Alliance, Australian
Sex Worker Association, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Abstract:

Background: Female sex workers in Australia have achieved some of the lowest documented prevalences of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmissible infections globally but rates overall are increasing in Australia and warrant closer investigation.

Methods: We constructed a retrospective cohort using repeat testing data extracted from a network of 42 sexual health clinics. Poisson and Cox regression were used to determined trends in incidence and risk factors for HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and infectious syphilis among female sex workers.

Results: From 2009 to 2015, 18,475 women reporting sex work attended a participating service. The overall incidence of urogenital chlamydia was 7.7/100 person years (PY), declining by 38% from 2009 to 2013 before increasing by 43% to 2015 (P < 0.001); anorectal chlamydia incidence was 0.6/100 PY, and pharyngeal was 1.9/100 PY, which increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.001, both). For gonorrhoea, the urogenital incidence was 1.4/100 PY, anorectal incidence was 0.3/100 PY, P < 0.001), and 3.6/100 PY for pharyngeal; urogenital incidence doubled during the study period, anorectal increased fivefold, and pharyngeal more than tripled (P < 0.001, all). Incidence of infectious syphilis was 0.4/100 PY, which remained stable from 2009 to 2015 (P = 0.09). There were seven incident infections of HIV among female sex workers (0.1/100 PY). Inconsistent condom use with private partners, higher number of private partner numbers, recent injecting drug use, younger age, and country of birth variously predicted sexually transmissible infections among female sex workers.

Conclusions: Although infectious syphilis and HIV remain uncommon in female sex workers attending Australian sexual health clinics, the increasing incidence of gonorrhoea across anatomical sites and increasing chlamydia after a period of decline demands enhanced health promotion initiatives.

DOWNLOAD full text

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia: A Retrospective Cohort Study (PDF)

Tasmanian sex workers appeal to save funding for sexual health awareness project

ABC News, 19/05/2016

Tasmanian sex workers are writing to Health Minister Michael Ferguson asking him to reverse his decision to stop funding a sexual health program.

The Tasmanian Sex Worker project supports local and fly-in, fly-out sex workers with information and access to sexual health screening and treatment services.

Read more here

Sex workers call for better education around kids and porn – not censorship

The Age, March 29, 2016 – 10:04PM

The peak body for Australian sex workers has called for better education to help children deal with pornography if they are exposed to it, rather than increased censorship.

A Senate inquiry into the potential harm being done to Australian children “through access to pornography on the internet” has been inundated by more than 140 submissions.

  • Read more of article here
  • Access the submissions to the Senate Committee here (NB: the Scarlet Alliance submission is submission number 119)

Scarlet Alliance has two Positions Vacant (Sydney)

Scarlet Alliance, March 2016

  • Please note that sex work experience is necessary to apply for these jobs

Scarlet Alliance, Australian Sex Workers Association, through their objectives, policies and programs, aims to achieve equality, social, legal, political, cultural and economic justice for past and present workers in the sex industry, in order for sex workers to be self-determining agents, building their own alliances and choosing where and how they work.

  1. Migration Project Officer – 2 days per week – Sydney

If you are a bilingual sex worker who can speak, read and write either Thai / Cantonese / Mandarin / Korean and English, Scarlet Alliance needs you for the Migration Project! We are currently recruiting for a Migration Project Officer for the Sydney office, 2 days per week to work alongside the Migration Project Manager.

The Migration Project Officer’s role involves 4 main parts.

1- To support migrant sex workers with migration and legal issues and advice on workplace rights and responsibilities;

2- To support the capacity of state and territory peer educators in delivering services to migrant sex workers;

3- To represent issues for migrant sex workers to a variety of stakeholders with evidence that is informed by regular Migrant Sex Worker Steering Committee meetings;

4- Work in partnership with Empower Thailand to increase the information that is available to sex workers in Thailand on their legal and migration rights and responsibilities.

More information and application kit is available at http://scarletalliance.org.au/library/APPLIC_KIT_MPO_Bilingual_SYD_%20MAR16

If you are interested in the position but unsure whether you meet the selection criteria please call Jules on 02 9517 2577.

Applications close on the 7th of April, 2016.

Applications addressing the selection criteria (outlined in the attached application kit) along with a current CV and at least two (2) referees, must be received by 5pm on 7th of April, 2016.

  1. National Training and Assessment Program Coordinator  – 1 day per week– Sydney

This dynamic and rewarding position is based in Sydney. The Scarlet Alliance National Training and Assessment Program aims to increase the workforce development of, and number of, trained and qualified sex worker peer educators through separate training and assessment packages designed by sex workers to meet the needs of sex worker peer educators. The assessments are a formally recognised, national diploma qualification through a partnership with an external Registered Training Organisation (RTO).

The SANTAP coordinator is responsible for the coordination of the assessment of peer educators, the facilitation of the SANTAP Assessors Network, monitoring and promoting the National Peer Educator Training Online Project, promotion of SANTAP amongst the Scarlet Alliance membership, and liaising between the RTO and Scarlet Alliance.

More information and application kit is available at http://scarletalliance.org.au/library/APPLIC_KIT_SANTAP_SYD_%20MAR16

If you are interested in the position but unsure whether you meet the selection criteria please call Jules on 02 9517 2577.

Applications close on the 7th of April, 2016.

Applications addressing the selection criteria (outlined in the attached application kit) along with a current CV and at least two (2) referees, must be received by 5pm on 7th of April, 2016.

 

 

 

 

Migrant sex workers in Australia (report)

Lauren Renshaw, Jules Kim
Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology, November 2015

In this report the Australian Institute of Criminology, in partnership with Scarlet Alliance, the Australian Sex Workers Association, presents one of the first pieces of research specifically conducted on the work and migration experiences of migrant sex workers in Australia.

Surveying a large sample of migrant and non-migrant sex workers across a range of states and territories in Australia, the study has enabled an assessment to be made of the demographic profile, work conditions and access to services of migrant sex workers.

It contrasts and compares the experiences of migrant sex workers with those of Australian-born sex workers. The migration experiences and motivations of respondents for migrating to Australia are also documented and the possible pathways migrants may take in engaging in sex work are described, along with an analysis of the specific needs and services required by this group..

There has been little research conducted on the experiences of migrant sex workers both internationally and within Australia. This is despite widespread media and other reports highlighting the perception of migrant sex workers as particularly vulnerable to exploitation and human trafficking. This report focuses on consolidating current knowledge of migrants in the Australian sex industry, based on a review of the existing literature and an analysis of responses to a survey conducted among migrant and non-migrant sex workers in a range of states and territories in Australia in 2010

Download report (PDF) here