Lastest Gay Community Periodic Survey for Adelaide released

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, June 2019

Gay Community Periodic Survey: Adelaide 2018

Authors: Broady, T., Mao, L., Bavinton, B., Jeffries, D., Bartlett, S., Calabretto, H., Narciso, L., Prestage, G., & Holt.

The Adelaide Gay Community Periodic Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited at a range of gay community sites in Adelaide, and online throughout South Australia. The major aim of the survey is to provide data on sexual, drug use, and testing practices related to the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs) among gay men. The most recent survey, the twelfth in South Australia, was conducted in November and December 2018 to coincide with the Adelaide Feast Festival.

Key points

– The proportion of men who reported ever having been tested for HIV increased from 83% in 2011 to 87% in 2018.

– The percentage of non-HIV-positive men who reported testing for HIV in the 12 months prior to the survey remained stable (and was reported by 71% in 2018), although the percentage reporting three or more HIV tests in the previous year increased (from 11% in 2014 to 22% in 2018).

– The use of HIV treatment by HIV-positive men has remained stable over time (and was reported by 93% of HIV-positive men in 2018). The percentage of men on antiretroviral treatment who reported an undetectable viral load also remained stable (reported by 94% in 2018).

Mobile phone apps remained the most common way that men met male sex partners, reported by 44% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with regular male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIR) increased from 55% in 2011 to 65% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with casual male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIC) increased from 38% in 2011 to 51% in 2018.

– Most of the recent increase in CAIC appears to be attributable to the growing proportion of HIV-negative men using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

STI testing among HIV-negative men has remained stable over time, with 74% reporting any STI test in the year prior to the 2018 survey. The proportion of HIV-positive men reporting any STI test in the previous year decreased from 91% in 2011 to 72% in 2018.

Use of PrEP increased between 2014 and 2018 from 1% to 16% of non-HIV-positive men.

Adelaide abortion clinic calls for safe access from protesters

InDaily,  31/5/19

Staff at an Adelaide abortion clinic have called for safe access zone laws due to pro-life supporters they claim stand near the centre, holding placards and photographing and filming people entering and leaving.

Unlike New South Wales, Northern Territory, Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, Tasmania and Victoria, South Australia has no safe access zone laws that restrict protests and other activities outside abortion clinics.

 

Updated blood borne virus guidelines for health professionals in SA

SA Health, 11 April 2019

The ‘Australian National Guidelines for the Management of Healthcare Workers Living with Blood Borne Viruses and Healthcare Workers who Perform Exposure Prone Procedures at Risk of Exposure to Blood Borne Viruses’ have been updated. They can be viewed on the Commonwealth Department of Health website.

The guidelines are in two parts:

Part A provides information and recommendations for all healthcare workers, in particular:

  • healthcare workers who perform exposure prone procedures
  • healthcare workers living with a blood borne virus, and
  • doctors treating healthcare workers with a blood borne virus.

Part B provides information and recommendations for public health authorities including, but not limited to, hospitals and jurisdictional health departments, when managing or investigating a situation where a healthcare worker with a blood borne virus was not compliant with these guidelines and/or may have placed a patient(s) at risk of infection.

 

 

Update on multi-drug resistant shigella

SHINE SA, 7/3/2019

The shigella outbreak is continuing in South Australia. This is to advise clinicians to be on alert for a potential increase in shigella cases, and to highlight updated recommendations on treatment as released by the Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB).

The outbreak is predominantly in men who have sex with men (MSM) and there is a potential for further increase in numbers related to a larger outbreak in Victoria and NSW. We encourage you to be alert for clients who have recently traveled interstate.The CDCB is now recommending that patients with confirmed multi-drug resistant (MDR) shigella (or at risk of MDR shigella while awaiting sensitivities) be treated with five days of Ceftrixaone 1g IV, rather than 1 day (as recommended in the Public Health Alert issued in December 2018).

Surveillance of sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne viruses in South Australia, 2017

Communicable Disease Control Branch, SA Health, 2018

In 2017, there were 8,181 new notifications of STIs and BBVs in South Australia. This figure represents a 7% increase in the number of new notifications compared to notifications received in 2016, and a 14% increase compared to the five year average (2012-2016).

In 2017, there were 5,910 notifications of genital chlamydia making this the most commonly notified STI in South Australia.  The notification rate of chlamydia in 2017 was 343 per 100,000 population, and has been stable over the past five years.

There were no notifications of donovanosis in 2017.

There were 1,271 notifications of gonorrhoea in 2017. The notification rate of gonorrhoea increased from 45 per 100,000 population in 2014 to 74 per 100,000 population in 2017.

There were 158 notifications of infectious syphilis in 2017, the highest number of annual notifications in the past 10 years.

There were 60 new diagnoses of HIV infection in 2017. The notification rate of newly diagnosed HIV infection in 2017 was 3.5 per 100,000 population, above that in 2016 of 3.1 per 100,000 population. The notification rate in the Aboriginal population rose to 9.6 per 100,000 in 2017, up from 4.8 per 100,000 in 2016.

There were 11 notifications of newly acquired hepatitis B infection in 2017, above the five year average (2012-2016) of nine cases per year. There were 272 notifications of unspecified hepatitis B virus infection reported in 2017. The notification rate has declined in the Aboriginal population over the past five years.

There were 32 notifications of newly acquired hepatitis C in 2017. The majority of cases were males (75%). The notification rate of unspecified hepatitis C infection was 23 per 100,000 population in 2017.

There were 10 new diagnoses of hepatitis D infection in 2017, which is consistent with the five year average of 10 notifications per year.

 

 

 

 

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV: An overview for Health Professionals

SHINE SA, October 2018

Access to PEP after an eligible exposure to HIV is a medical emergency. Your response to patients presenting for PEP can support them in preventing a life-long infection with HIV.

A brief, online training module has been created to support health professionals to:

• Increase your understanding of PEP as an emergency presentation and vital HIV prevention measure
• Assist you in providing patients with optimal care and support when seeking PEP in the emergency setting

This course is designed for Medical Officers and Registered Nurses in hospital emergency departments and targeted primary care clinical and rural sites that hold PEP starter packs in South Australia.

  • To register for the free PEP training module, please email us here with your name, position and workplace.

SA Health has contributed funds towards this program.