Tough man stereotype can hurt women and men: report

Our Watch, November 2019

Men who conform only to rigid stereotypes of how to be a man are more likely to have sexist attitudes and behaviours, which in turn makes them more likely to perpetuate violence against women, according to a new report by Our Watch and the Victorian Office for Women.

The landmark study, Men in focus, is an extensive review of Australian and international research evidence on the topic, which aims to build a deeper understanding of masculinity, as well as providing guidance for those working with men and boys to prevent violence against women.

Cultural Safety workshops with Khadija Gbla (free event)

Morella Community Centre in collaboration with Khadija Gbla, October 2019

WHAT IS CULTURAL SAFETY?

Cultural safety is identified as “an environment that is safe for people: where there is no assault, challenge or denial of their identity, of who they are and what they need. It is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and experience, of learning, living and working together with dignity and truly listening”.

Culturally safe practices include actions which recognize and respect the cultural identities of others and safely meet their needs, expectations and rights. Alternatively, culturally unsafe practices are those that “diminish, demean or disempower the cultural identity and well-being of an individual”.

Through these workshops, participants will develop an understanding of cultural safety and how to apply cultural safety principles into their work and personal life.

WORKSHOP TOPICS:
SESSION 1: Friday 8th November – Introduction to Cultural Safety
SESSION 2: Friday 22nd November – Cultural Safety, an Educational context*
*This session is aimed for anyone working in an education setting
SESSION 3: Friday 6th December – Cultural Safety for Service Providers

TIME: 10am -11:30am for all workshop topics.

LOCATION: MORELLA COMMUNITY CENTRE
90 Kings Road, Parafield Gardens SA 5107

COST: Free

FACILITATOR: Khadija Gbla is a very passionate and inspiring African-Australian woman. She is an award-winning human rights activist, leader and inspirational speaker.
Khadija Gbla was born in Sierra Leone, spent her youth in Gambia, and as a teenager put down roots in Australia. Khadija was just 3 years old when the war broke out in her country, Sierra Leone and 10 years later they attained refugee status and resettled in Adelaide.
Khadija continues to provide advocacy, training, speaking on domestic and family violence, child protection, racism, human rights, refugees and cultural diversity through her cultural consultancy. She is the co-founder of The Desert Flower Centre and foundation Australia. The Desert Flower Australia is the first centre in Australia and the Asia pacific region that specialises in providing medical care and reconstructive surgery for women impacted by female genital mutilation. Khadija is a TEDX speaker with close to 2 million views on her talk, “My mother’s strange definition of empowerment”. She has represented Australia in the international arena at the Harvard National Model United Nations, Commonwealth Youth Forum and Australian and African Dialogue, Commonwealth heads of states Women’s forum etc. she has displayed great courage and determination in achieving her aspiration of giving women, youth and minority groups a voice at local, state and international level.

He, she, or … ? Gender-neutral pronouns reduce biases – study

The Guardian, Tue 6 Aug 2019 

A new study has found that using a gender-neutral pronoun reduces mental biases that favour men, and boosts positive feelings towards women and LGBT people.

The finding marks an easy win, the researchers believe, and shows how a minor change in language can help chip away at long-standing gender inequities.

 

Disrupting gender norms in health systems: making the case for change

The Lancet, Gender Equality, Norms, and Health Steering Committee, Published May 30, 2019

Summary

Restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities are replicated and reinforced in health systems, contributing to gender inequalities in health.
In this Series paper, we explore how to address all three through recognition and then with disruptive solutions.
We used intersectional feminist theory to guide our systematic reviews, qualitative case studies based on lived experiences, and quantitative analyses based on cross-sectional and evaluation research.
We found that health systems reinforce patients’ traditional gender roles and neglect gender inequalities in health, health system models and clinic-based programmes are rarely gender responsive, and women have less authority as health workers than men and are often devalued and abused.
With regard to potential for disruption, we found that gender equality policies are associated with greater representation of female physicians, which in turn is associated with better health outcomes, but that gender parity is insufficient to achieve gender equality. We found that institutional support and respect of nurses improves quality of care, and that women’s empowerment collectives can increase health-care access and provider responsiveness.
We see promise from social movements in supporting women’s reproductive rights and policies. Our findings suggest we must view gender as a fundamental factor that predetermines and shapes health systems and outcomes. Without addressing the role of restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities within and outside health systems, we will not reach our collective ambitions of universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals. We propose action to systematically identify and address restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities in health systems.

Let’s make it mandatory to teach respectful relationships in every Australian school

The Conversation, May 28, 2019 5.45am AEST

Media reports of findings from the latest National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey caused a stir in recent days, with some highlighting the importance of education programs to teach young people about gender-based violence.

Schools play a significant role in educating young people about gender-based violence and helping change the underlying attitudes that lead to it.

16 days of activism events: Charles Sturt is Saying No to Domestic and Family Violence

City of Charles Sturt, November 2018

Charles Sturt is partnering with local community groups, sports clubs, schools, businesses and key stakeholders to raise awareness and implement violence prevention activities. Several activities are planned for the 16 days of activism from the 25 November (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women) to 10 December (Human Rights Day).  The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign is a time to stimulate action to end violence around the world.

Act of love

Twelve artists have been paired up with members in our community affected by domestic and family violence to paint their portrait. The portraits are a thoughtful portrayal of a larger story capturing exhibition. The Act of Love is the interchange between the artist and the sitter, with the finished portrait being gifted to the sitter at the end of the exhibition.

Clothesline Project

Community members are encouraged to share their unique and empowering responses to Domestic and family violence and decorate a t-shirt. All the t-shirts will be strung up on clotheslines and displayed at various locations across the city to raise awareness. Various locations will be available to paint the t-shirts.

Message to my Love campaign

During the sixteen days of activism at the Civic Library, the Digital Story Box will become a personal story capturing device. Our community will be invited to pick up the phone, listen to a story and then record a personal message of love and respect for a loved one in their life. This could be a daughter, son, partner, parent, best friend or anyone that you love. Leaders in our community will initially be interviewed  and these stories will then be able to be viewed and heard as part of the campaign.

Associated events and exhibitions will also be scheduled during this time as a way to share messages and stories which aim to raise confidence and awareness in our community.

As part of the Message to my Love project, we will be sending post cards with rates notices for community to write their messages. There will be a survey monkey link on the post card for people to fill in online or their will be selected locations to drop in the postcard where they will be displayed as part of the #messagetomylove campaign.

We will be out and about filming community messages at different public spaces. Keep an eye out on our website, social media for further information.

This is an exciting time for our council.  We are committed to creating safe families and communities for everyone and we welcome your involvement in these activities. If you would like more information about these activities and programs please contact Khadija at: kgbla@charlesturt.sa.gov.au

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence or feel unsafe in an intimate or family relationship, 24 hour assistance is available on 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732), which is the National Sexual Assault Domestic & Family Violence Counselling Service. Or you can go to www.1800respect.org.au