It’s hard to think about, but frail older women in nursing homes get sexually abused too

The Conversation, November 22, 2018 6.02am AEDT

We don’t often think of older women being victims of sexual assault, but such assaults occur in many settings and circumstances, including in nursing homes. Our research, published this week in the journal Legal Medicine, analysed 28 forensic medical examinations of female nursing home residents who had allegedly been victims of sexual assault in Victoria over a 15-year period.

The majority of the alleged victims had some form of cognitive or physical impairment. All 14 perpetrators who were reported were male, half of whom were staff and half other residents.

 

 

Media coverage of methamphetamine use in SA “demonising”

InDaily Adelaide, August 1, 2018

The head of South Australia’s drug and alcohol services network says recent reports on the use of methamphetamine in the workplace are misleading and could cause people to turn away from seeking treatment.

 

Some women feel grief after an abortion, but there’s no evidence of serious mental health issues

The Conversation, April 26, 2018 12.36pm AEST

This week, the website Mamamia published, and then quickly removed, an article about the existence of “post-abortion syndrome” – a disorder apparently experienced by many women who have had an abortion. The article claimed this disorder has been concealed from the public and that the trauma of an induced abortion can be comparable to the experience of child sexual abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suffered by war veterans.

Neither the term “post-abortion syndrome”, nor the claims about its characteristics, are supported by any national or international psychological societies. Of course, many women experience emotional responses to an abortion, which are normal reactions to a significant event.

 

 

Respectful reporting on gender identity

The Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission, 10 January 2017

Kristen Hilton, Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commissioner, said that despite great advances in recent years, misgendering still occurs in the media and can be particularly harmful to trans people.

“Getting the language right is respectful and easy to achieve,” Commissioner Hilton said. The Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission has developed an easy-to-use gender identity reporting guide to help with this.

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HIV Criminal Cases: Media Guide

AFAO, Updated 2016

In Australia, each state/territory has different criminal laws under which someone can be charged with reckless, negligent or deliberate transmission of HIV to another person (generally for sexual transmission), or for exposing another person to HIV. Criminal cases in Australia involving HIV transmission or exposure are rare.

The quality of Australian media reports of criminal cases involving HIV transmission or exposure varies: on some occasions it has been accurate but on others media reports have been inaccurate  or overtly sensational.

The effect of sensationalised reporting that misrepresent the facts is that it can feed misconceptions regarding transmission and risk, dehumanise the people involved in the cases and demonise all people with HIV.

The Media Tool Kit as a whole contains the following topics:

  • Reporting on HIV prevention
  • Reporting on PrEP
  • Reporting HIV data
  • HIV cure research
  • HIV criminal cases
  • HIV exposure risk in the community
  • Reporting HIV: best practice tips +
  • Ethics and principles for HIV reporting
  • Background briefings
  • Media releases
  • HIV timeline

Read more here

Media representations of violence against women and their children: Final report

ANROWS, Monday, 6th June 2016

This project aimed to establish the extent and nature of reporting of violence against women by the Australian media to inform future strategies for change.

Using both quantitative (content analysis) and qualitative (critical discourse analysis) methods, the study provided a glimpse into the complexity of reporting practices.

It found that:

 

  • There is a clear link between media reporting and attitudes and beliefs in relation to violence against women, with audiences’ emotional responses and attributions of responsibility affected by how the media frames news.
  • The vast majority of reporting on violence against women was “incident based”, looking at tragic individual instances, but not exploring the issue in a more depth.

Read more here