More than half of fertility and period-tracker apps ineffective at predicting ovulation, study finds

ABC Health & Wellbeing,  17/09/2019

An Australian study of the most downloaded fertility apps has found over half didn’t perform well at predicting ovulation — which is exactly what many users are using these apps for.

The findings, by researchers at Eve Health Fertility in Brisbane in conjunction with Queensland Fertility Group, were presented at a Fertility Society of Australia conference this week in Hobart.

A guide to My Health Record: for BBV & STI healthcare providers to support their patients

ASHM  (Australasian Society for HIV Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine)

Healthcare providers can play a crucial role in helping patients make informed decisions about whether and indeed the extent, to engage with the My Health Record, particularly for those patients with BBVs and/or other potentially stigmatising conditions.

To support those conversations, ASHM has created A guide to My Health Record: for BBV & STI healthcare providers to support their patients. The guide outlines the key issues associated with My Health Record, and provides four key recommendations to clinicians around advising patients on how to engage with the system.

Though the opt-out period ends soon, clinicians still have an ongoing obligation to provide advice to patients around the benefits as well as the privacy and security control options available, to guide their decision-making around engaging with My Health Record.

With increased media attention on My Health Record in recent weeks, some specifics of the system may change. A guide to My Health Record is a living document and will be updated with any relevant changes as further details emerge.

Australia will never be HIV-free if access to prevention requires a medicare card

The Conversation, January 23, 2019 12.21pm AEDT

by Nicholas Medland, Sexual health physician and senior researcher, UNSW

Australia aims to “virtually eliminate” HIV transmission by 2022, according to the health minister’s new national HIV strategy. This ambitious goal has been made possible by biomedical HIV prevention, a new and highly effective way of preventing HIV using medications.

But new inequalities are emerging between those who can and can’t access these medications because of their Medicare eligibility. These inequalities may undermine the success of HIV elimination in Australia and threaten Australia’s international reputation as a safe place to study, work and live.

Read more of Australia will never be HIV-free if access to prevention requires a medicare card

 

Rules about sex: getting them right – upcoming training day

SHINE SA, September 2018

This stand-alone workshop introduces participants to a wide range of education resources that may be borrowed from SHINE SA and provides permanent access to an electronic resource on CD that can be applied immediately in the workplace.

The CD based resource has been produced to assist workers and carers to assess knowledge and teach rules about touch and sexual behaviour and strategies for sexual safety and improved relationships.

In this practical full-day module, you will be supported to apply the resource practically and ethically, using your own laptop.

The aims are to:
> reduce sexual victimisation of people with disability
> reduce the incidence of sexual behaviours which may cause offence to others
> prevent vulnerable people with a disability from involvement with the law and possible long-term consequences of this

Suitable participants include: developmental educators, service coordinators, special
education workers, therapists, disability advocates, police and parents.

Important: Please bring a laptop computer with a CD drive, installed with MS Word,
MS Powerpoint, or equivalent. An external plug-in mouse will be an advantage.

Details:
When – Monday 22 October 2018
Where – SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time – 9:30am – 4:30pm
Cost – $175

 

Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report

RMIT University, 16 Aug 2018

Less than a third of LGBTIQ+ employees in Australia are out to all their colleagues and this significantly compromises their wellbeing and work performance, new research has found.

According to the Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report released today, roughly 25 per cent of employees were out to some people and almost 40 per cent were out to most people at work.

The report was based on an online survey of more than 1,600 LGBTIQ+ workers about their experiences, as well as face-to-face think tanks with more than 60 LGBTIQ+ employees working at various levels across a range of organisations and industries.

The joint RMIT and Diversity Council Australia (DCA) report highlighted the complexities related to coming out at work – from coming out multiple times a day, week or year; coming out to some colleagues but not others; and being outed against their will.

Workplace culture, genuine bold leadership and policies were identified as the keys to creating an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff felt safe to come out.

Grey area: The fragile frontier of dementia, intimacy and sexual consent

The Globe & Mail (Canada), July 14, 2018

Amid ever-widening cultural conversations about sexual consent, dementia remains uncharted territory. As Canadians live longer, more are moving into long-term care with advancing dementia disorders. It’s a growing population with complex needs, not least of all in their intimate lives.

In the close-quarters environment of nursing homes, these people’s sexuality poses difficult ethical dilemmas for staff and for families