Flux Study COVID-19 Diary Recruitment and Report

Kirby Institute, UNSW, July 2020

Social distancing restrictions due to COVID-19 may affect how gay and bisexual men are arranging their sex lives and taking care of their health. And this will likely also affect trends in HIV infection and STIs over coming months, or even years. Monitoring the impact of COVID-19, before, during, and after the pandemic, is essential to understanding and responding to trends in HIV infection, mental health, and STIs.

​This study investigating the lived experiences of COVID-19 among gay and bisexual men including isolation, support, mental health and resilience, income loss, and access to health services. We will address how gay and bisexual men experience, engage with, and emerge from, COVID-19.

What does participation in this research require? 

If you decide to take part in this study, we will ask you to do the following:

  1. Your first questionnaire: This questionnaire collects information about you and your previous experiences.

  2. Weekly diary: After completing the your first survey, you will be asked to complete a 5-minute diary each Sunday.

What’s in it for you? 

We value our participants! To show our appreciation, for every survey you complete, you’ll automatically go in a raffle to win prizes in the form of gift cards to the value of $200.

Links

Marie Stopes Australia seeks signatories to open letter re changes to telehealth

July 2020
 
There are changes to Telehealth from Monday, July 20th which mean that clients who have not attended a service within the last 12 months – that is, new clients or clients who have not used a service in the last 12 months – will no longer be eligible for a Telehealth appointment.
 
Marie Stopes Australia has written an open letter about the impact of this change access to sexual and reproductive health services. If you are interested in endorsing the letter, you can add your name as a private individual or an organisation. 
 

Information about TRUVADA and ATRIPLA delisting

Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations (AFAO), March 30th 2020

From 1 April 2020 Truvada for HIV treatment and for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) will no longer be available through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).

There are alternatives to Truvada for PrEP in Australia.

Community members eligible for PrEP can access generic versions of Truvada supplied by Apotex, Mylan and Lupin Generic Health. The drugs manufactured by these three suppliers contain the same active ingredients as Truvada.

In addition, from October 2020 Atripla will be delisted. A generic equivalent of Atripla has been approved by the PBS for community members who wish to continue using Atripla.

We encourage you to talk to your prescribing doctor if you want more information about these changes.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Increased usage and confidence in antiretroviral PrEP for the prevention of HIV found in UNSW study

UNSW, December 2019

The number of gay and bisexual men using PrEP to prevent HIV infection has almost doubled in the last two years, according to the latest report from the PrEPARE Project.  

The national online survey of Australian gay and bisexual men found that 43% of gay and bisexual men had used the antiretroviral drug in 2019, up from 24% in 2017. This increase aligns with falling HIV infections among gay and bisexual men in many jurisdictions.

The PrEP users surveyed reported positive experiences of using the drug, with the majority reporting reduced concern about HIV and increased sexual pleasure as a result. They also reported fewer concerns about disclosing PrEP use to others.

  • Read the 2019 survey report by the Centre for Social Research in Health.

 

“I’m never having sex with anybody ever again”: what helps PLHIV get over these feelings

nam/aidsmap, 27 January 2020

For people living with HIV, sexual adjustment after diagnosis is affected by fears of transmitting the virus and of possible rejection by sexual partners, new qualitative research shows. Healthy sexual adjustment over time is facilitated by partner acceptance; peer, community and professional support; and up-to-date knowledge of HIV transmission, including U=U.

Barriers to healthy sexual adjustment include the persistence of undue fears of transmission and rejection long after diagnosis, which may result in avoiding sex or pairing it with drugs and alcohol. Based on these findings, Dr Ben Huntingdon and colleagues at the University of Sydney propose a new model of sexual adjustment to HIV, published in the BMC Infectious Diseases journal.

Thirty participants (19 male, 11 female) out of 45 PLWH who agreed to be contacted completed the interview and questionnaire as part of the study.

Multilingual booklet in 8 languages – HIV: What you need to know

Multicultural HIV and Hepatitis Service, NSW, 2019

The new multilingual booklet, HIV. What you need to know, summarises the most current information on HIV.

It explains what it means to have HIV as well as ways to protect yourself from getting HIV and passing it on to others.

It also explains how to get tested, and how HIV is treated, including a comprehensive list of HIV health care and support services available in NSW.

Information about the Australian health care system, and HIV and legal issues are also provided.

Available in eight languages, the free booklet was developed in consultation with our communities.

  • Click on the language below to download the e-booklet
  • To order free hard copies of the  booklet please complete the order form and email to info@mhahs.org.au

 

English Arabic
Chinese Indonesian
Portuguese Spanish
Thai Vietnamese