Sexual health and its linkages to reproductive health: an operational approach

 World Health Organization, 2017

Sexual health and reproductive health are closely linked, but crucial aspects of sexual health can be overlooked when grouped under or together with the domain of reproductive health.

In order to create broader awareness of comprehensive sexual health interventions and to ensure that sexual health and reproductive health both receive full attention in programming (including provision of health services) and research, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reviewed its working definition of sexual health to create a framework for an operational approach to sexual health.

The framework, which is intended to support policy-makers and programme implementers and to provide a stronger foundation for further research and learning in sexual health, is presented and described in full in this brief.

Responding to Female Genital Mutilation as a women’s health issue (forum)

SHine SA, January 2017

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons (WHO). It is also sometimes referred to as female genital cutting or female circumcision. There are 83,000 women and girls who have been affected by FGM in Australia. FGM has no health benefits but causes lifelong health consequences for women and girls.

Our ReFRESH forum will consist of a presentation on the topic and a personal experience of FGM. The aim is to provide participants with a better understanding of FGM. We will explore where, when, how and why FGM is practised, and how to care for survivors.

When: 9 February 2017

Where: SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Time: 1.30 – 4.30 pm

Cost: $50 (Student Concession $45)

Light refreshments provided

FURTHER INFORMATION & ONLINE ENROLMENT here

Enquiries: Phone 8300 5320 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Download flyer here: FGM Forum

No waiting game: Immediate birth control implant post-partum is more cost-effective

Yale News, June 8, 2015

Women who have just given birth are often motivated to prevent a rapid, repeat pregnancy. For those who prefer a contraceptive implant, getting the procedure in the hospital immediately after giving birth is more cost-effective than delaying insertion to a 6-8 week postpartum visit, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers.

Read more here

Sexual problems equally common after C-section and vaginal birth

Reuters, Fri Mar 6, 2015 1:50pm EST

After giving birth, women often struggle with reduced sexual desire and arousal, but how they delivered – by caesarean or vaginally – is not to blame, a small study suggests.

Read more here

Link found between pain during or after sexual intercourse and mode of [baby] delivery

Eureka Alert, 21-Jan-2015

Operative birth is associated with persisting pain during or after sexual intercourse, known as dyspareunia, suggests a new study published today (21 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

Read more here