Changes to Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Distribution

SHINE SA,  

SHINE SA will now temporarily provide a full 28-day supply of Post-exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) medication in place of the usual five-day starter pack. This measure has been put in place with the assistance of SA Health to help limit movement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prior to the pandemic, clients received a five-day HIV PEP starter pack and then the remaining medication after a follow-up appointment. Clients can now call SHINE SA for a telehealth appointment where our team will guide clients through the process including supply of the medications and blood tests. Follow-up care arrangements will remain in place.

What is PEP?

PEP is a four week long course of medication taken to reduce the risk of HIV infection. It needs to be initiated within 72 hours of possible contact with HIV in order to help prevent the chance of infection. Exposure can occur through unprotected sex or the sharing of needles and other injection equipment.

It’s important that PEP is accessed as soon as possible after you think you may been exposed to HIV. If you are outside of the time-frame you can still contact your local GP or SHINE SA for further assistance.

What are the most common reasons for needing PEP?

  • Sex without a condom or sex where a condom broke or slipped off, with a person who has, or might have, HIV.
  • Sharing needles or syringes with a person who has, or might have, HIV.

How can I find out more?

  • The PEP Hotline is available 24 hours a day on 1800 022 026. The Registered Nurse on the PEP hotline will help assess your needs and indicate where to access PEP near you.
  • To speak to SHINE SA about accessing PEP call 8300 5300.
  • To learn more about PEP you can visit the SAMESH website or call 7099 5300.

From: https://www.shinesa.org.au/changes-to-pep/

Increased usage and confidence in antiretroviral PrEP for the prevention of HIV found in UNSW study

UNSW, December 2019

The number of gay and bisexual men using PrEP to prevent HIV infection has almost doubled in the last two years, according to the latest report from the PrEPARE Project.  

The national online survey of Australian gay and bisexual men found that 43% of gay and bisexual men had used the antiretroviral drug in 2019, up from 24% in 2017. This increase aligns with falling HIV infections among gay and bisexual men in many jurisdictions.

The PrEP users surveyed reported positive experiences of using the drug, with the majority reporting reduced concern about HIV and increased sexual pleasure as a result. They also reported fewer concerns about disclosing PrEP use to others.

  • Read the 2019 survey report by the Centre for Social Research in Health.

 

Multilingual booklet in 8 languages – HIV: What you need to know

Multicultural HIV and Hepatitis Service, NSW, 2019

The new multilingual booklet, HIV. What you need to know, summarises the most current information on HIV.

It explains what it means to have HIV as well as ways to protect yourself from getting HIV and passing it on to others.

It also explains how to get tested, and how HIV is treated, including a comprehensive list of HIV health care and support services available in NSW.

Information about the Australian health care system, and HIV and legal issues are also provided.

Available in eight languages, the free booklet was developed in consultation with our communities.

  • Click on the language below to download the e-booklet
  • To order free hard copies of the  booklet please complete the order form and email to info@mhahs.org.au

 

English Arabic
Chinese Indonesian
Portuguese Spanish
Thai Vietnamese

U and Me Can Stop HIV (video)

YoungDeadlyFree, December 2019

U and me Can Stop HIV: this 8-minute animated video is designed to reach Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with the latest information on HIV. 

Animations can help explain the facts about STIs and BBVs in an engaging way that’s easy to understand, and not too confronting. YoungDeadlyFree have produced these animations for young people to access directly via social media but they’re also great tools for community education.

As well as setting out the facts about STIs and BBVs, each of these animations aims to normalise STI and BBV testing, and address the stigma and shame we can feel when talking about sex, STIs and BBVs.

  • Watch embedded video below:

Free Online Recordings for Health Professionals: Andrology and Sexual Health

SHINE SA, January 2020

SHINE SA have made select online recordings available from our Andrology and Sexual Health Update Day event in 2019. These recordings will be beneficial to health professionals looking to brush up on their knowledge of andrology and sexual health.

The online recordings available cover topics including sexual dysfunction, pelvic pain, PrEP and PEP, chemsex, androgen deficiency, gender affirming care and the SA syphilis outbreak.

All recording are available free of charge.

HIV and viral hepatitis disclosure [in South Australia] – factsheet

SA Health, updated 2019

Deciding to disclose your HIV or viral hepatitis (hepatitis B or hepatitis C) status is a personal choice. There are few situations where you are legally required to disclose your HIV or viral hepatitis status, however, there may be times when it’s in your best interests to disclose your status even if you are not legally required to do so.