HIV and viral hepatitis disclosure [in South Australia] – factsheet

SA Health, updated 2019

Deciding to disclose your HIV or viral hepatitis (hepatitis B or hepatitis C) status is a personal choice. There are few situations where you are legally required to disclose your HIV or viral hepatitis status, however, there may be times when it’s in your best interests to disclose your status even if you are not legally required to do so.

 

HIV & the Law: updated content from ASHM

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, 2019

The NEW Guide to Australian HIV Laws and Policies for Healthcare Professionals includes two new sections on Mandatory Testing for HIV and My Health Record.

This resource aims to provide health care workers with information on legal and ethical responsibilities under various laws and regulations related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It does not contain legal advice. Those seeking advice on individual cases should contact their health department, solicitor or their medical defence organisation as appropriate.

In the interests of brevity, laws have been summarised and re-written specifically as they relate to HIV. In many instances key legislation is more broadly targeted at a range of infectious diseases (with definitions varying by state).

All efforts have been made to ensure the content is current at time of publication.

STI/BBV testing tool for asymptomatic people

NSW STI Programs Unit, ASHM & Qld. Govt.,  2019

This resource has charts and information about how routine STI/BBV testing can be offered, who to, and how to follow up.

Developed by NSW STI Programs Unit, NSW Australia, and reproduced with permission by the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, ASHM and Communicable Diseases Branch.

 

 

Hyde Street Practice: a service of SHINE SA

SHINE SA, September 2019

Hyde Street Practice is a service of SHINE SA. We offer affordable appointments with friendly and non-judgemental staff.

We are a safe and inclusive practice with general practitioners, specialist services, sexual health and relationship wellbeing services.

Services include:

  • General Practitioners

General GP services, including support for diabetes and cardiovascular health, Pre and post exposure HIV prevention (PEP and PrEP), HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C prescribing, STI testing and management

  • Sexual Health Services

SHINE SA sexual health services including contraception, STI testing and management, HIV, PEP & PrEP

  • Sexual Health Physician

A private specialist sexual health and HIV service available by referral

HIV, sexual health, PEP & PrEP, hepatitis C, transgender medicine, LGBTI health

  • Rapido – Rapid HIV Testing

Walk in and Wait service, peer led with results in 20 minutes

  • Psychologist and Counselling

General psychological services and sexual health counselling

  • Gender Wellbeing Service

Professional, peer support and information services for people who are questioning their gender or who identify as trans or gender diverse

  • SAMESH

Support services for gay men, MSM (men who have sex with men), trans men and people living with HIV and people at risk of HIV and STIs, health promotion and education

  • Bobby Goldsmith Foundation

Financial assistance for health related issues to people living with HIV on low incomes

Details:

57 Hyde Street, Adelaide
Call 7099 5320
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fees available on hydestreet.com.au
To make an appointment visit
www.hydestreet.com.au

or call 7099 5320

Rapido – Rapid HIV Testing
Mondays 3:00 – 6:00 pm
(except Public Holidays)

Sexual Health Service
Walk in and Wait
Fridays 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Clean Needle Program
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Lastest Gay Community Periodic Survey for Adelaide released

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, June 2019

Gay Community Periodic Survey: Adelaide 2018

Authors: Broady, T., Mao, L., Bavinton, B., Jeffries, D., Bartlett, S., Calabretto, H., Narciso, L., Prestage, G., & Holt.

The Adelaide Gay Community Periodic Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited at a range of gay community sites in Adelaide, and online throughout South Australia. The major aim of the survey is to provide data on sexual, drug use, and testing practices related to the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs) among gay men. The most recent survey, the twelfth in South Australia, was conducted in November and December 2018 to coincide with the Adelaide Feast Festival.

Key points

– The proportion of men who reported ever having been tested for HIV increased from 83% in 2011 to 87% in 2018.

– The percentage of non-HIV-positive men who reported testing for HIV in the 12 months prior to the survey remained stable (and was reported by 71% in 2018), although the percentage reporting three or more HIV tests in the previous year increased (from 11% in 2014 to 22% in 2018).

– The use of HIV treatment by HIV-positive men has remained stable over time (and was reported by 93% of HIV-positive men in 2018). The percentage of men on antiretroviral treatment who reported an undetectable viral load also remained stable (reported by 94% in 2018).

Mobile phone apps remained the most common way that men met male sex partners, reported by 44% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with regular male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIR) increased from 55% in 2011 to 65% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with casual male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIC) increased from 38% in 2011 to 51% in 2018.

– Most of the recent increase in CAIC appears to be attributable to the growing proportion of HIV-negative men using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

STI testing among HIV-negative men has remained stable over time, with 74% reporting any STI test in the year prior to the 2018 survey. The proportion of HIV-positive men reporting any STI test in the previous year decreased from 91% in 2011 to 72% in 2018.

Use of PrEP increased between 2014 and 2018 from 1% to 16% of non-HIV-positive men.

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV: An overview for Health Professionals

SHINE SA, October 2018

Access to PEP after an eligible exposure to HIV is a medical emergency. Your response to patients presenting for PEP can support them in preventing a life-long infection with HIV.

A brief, online training module has been created to support health professionals to:

• Increase your understanding of PEP as an emergency presentation and vital HIV prevention measure
• Assist you in providing patients with optimal care and support when seeking PEP in the emergency setting

This course is designed for Medical Officers and Registered Nurses in hospital emergency departments and targeted primary care clinical and rural sites that hold PEP starter packs in South Australia.

  • To register for the free PEP training module, please email us here with your name, position and workplace.

SA Health has contributed funds towards this program.