Lastest Gay Community Periodic Survey for Adelaide released

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, June 2019

Gay Community Periodic Survey: Adelaide 2018

Authors: Broady, T., Mao, L., Bavinton, B., Jeffries, D., Bartlett, S., Calabretto, H., Narciso, L., Prestage, G., & Holt.

The Adelaide Gay Community Periodic Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited at a range of gay community sites in Adelaide, and online throughout South Australia. The major aim of the survey is to provide data on sexual, drug use, and testing practices related to the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs) among gay men. The most recent survey, the twelfth in South Australia, was conducted in November and December 2018 to coincide with the Adelaide Feast Festival.

Key points

– The proportion of men who reported ever having been tested for HIV increased from 83% in 2011 to 87% in 2018.

– The percentage of non-HIV-positive men who reported testing for HIV in the 12 months prior to the survey remained stable (and was reported by 71% in 2018), although the percentage reporting three or more HIV tests in the previous year increased (from 11% in 2014 to 22% in 2018).

– The use of HIV treatment by HIV-positive men has remained stable over time (and was reported by 93% of HIV-positive men in 2018). The percentage of men on antiretroviral treatment who reported an undetectable viral load also remained stable (reported by 94% in 2018).

Mobile phone apps remained the most common way that men met male sex partners, reported by 44% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with regular male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIR) increased from 55% in 2011 to 65% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with casual male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIC) increased from 38% in 2011 to 51% in 2018.

– Most of the recent increase in CAIC appears to be attributable to the growing proportion of HIV-negative men using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

STI testing among HIV-negative men has remained stable over time, with 74% reporting any STI test in the year prior to the 2018 survey. The proportion of HIV-positive men reporting any STI test in the previous year decreased from 91% in 2011 to 72% in 2018.

Use of PrEP increased between 2014 and 2018 from 1% to 16% of non-HIV-positive men.

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV: An overview for Health Professionals

SHINE SA, October 2018

Access to PEP after an eligible exposure to HIV is a medical emergency. Your response to patients presenting for PEP can support them in preventing a life-long infection with HIV.

A brief, online training module has been created to support health professionals to:

• Increase your understanding of PEP as an emergency presentation and vital HIV prevention measure
• Assist you in providing patients with optimal care and support when seeking PEP in the emergency setting

This course is designed for Medical Officers and Registered Nurses in hospital emergency departments and targeted primary care clinical and rural sites that hold PEP starter packs in South Australia.

  • To register for the free PEP training module, please email us here with your name, position and workplace.

SA Health has contributed funds towards this program.

HIV PrEP update & HIV prescriber update in Adelaide

ASHM, October 2018

HIV PrEP Update for GPs and Practice Nurses

This training will provide GPs, Nurses, and Health Professionals working in primary care an update on strategies available for the prevention of HIV transmission, focusing on prevention particularly pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

– Date Tuesday, 23 October 2018
– Venue Mercure Grosvenor, 125 North Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000
– Time 6:15pm – 9:30 pm (Registration from 6:15pm, webinar broadcasts from 6:45pm)

At the end of this update, participants will be able to;
– Describe HIV epidemiology in Australia and the different HIV prevention
strategies
– Explain the role of HIV treatment and management
–  Provide patient education on the effectiveness and appropriate use of
PrEP/PEP
– Identify the prescribing pathways of PrEP within your local jurisdiction

This evening educational session will be presented by Dr Charlotte Bell, Sexual
Health Physician – Royal Adelaide Hospital.

This course is also available as a webinar, please contact Emma Williams here
for webinar registration

Register for this course at:
http://www.ashm.org.au/training/
Registrations close: Friday, 19 October 2018

Download flyer here: HIV PrEP Update_23Oct2018


HIV s100 Prescriber Dinner Update: 2018 IAS Conference Report Back and
Complex HIV Case Discussion

ASHM would like to invite HIV s100 Prescribers and medical practitioners in South Australia to attend this dinner training.

– Date Wednesday, 24 October 2018
– Venue Mercure Grosvenor, 125 North Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000
– Time 6:15pm – 9:30 pm (Registration starts 6:15pm, Webinar from 6:50pm)
– Cost FREE, Dinner and refreshments will be provided on site

This dinner workshop will bring attendees an overview of the content showcased at the
2018 International AIDS Conference held in Amsterdam, as well as a number of complex HIV cases to discuss. The first session is a conference report back
session. Professor Mark Boyd will provide an update on the latest studies, important
developments and best research methods in the ongoing battle against HIV, AIDS and
related infectious diseases from the IAS Conference 2018.

The second session will be an interactive panel discussion, focussing on the
management of complex HIV cases. Panellists include Professor Mark Boyd, Dr Russell Waddell (Consultant Sexual Health Physician and Clinical Director STD Services, Royal Adelaide Hospital) and Dr Andrew Beckwith (Senior Consultant Psychiatrist, Director of Training, HIV/Hep C Liaison Psychiatrist, CALHN Mental Health). The session will be hosted by Dr Samuel Elliott (Principal General Practitioner, Riverside Family Medical Practice).

This course is also available as a webinar, please contact Emma Williams here
for webinar registration

Register for this course at:
http://www.ashm.org.au/training/
Registrations close: Friday, 19 October 2018

Download flyer here: HIV Prescriber Update_24Oct2018

General Practice Sexual Health Update Day

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM), March 2018

 

*Please note this training is for GPs and practice nurses. 

Changing attitudes to and engagement with biomedical HIV prevention by gay and bisexual men

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, 2017

The latest findings from the PrEPARE Project have now been published. The  PrEPARE Project is a longitudinal study of Australian gay and bisexual men’s attitudes to biomedical HIV prevention, particularly PrEP and treatment as prevention (TasP).

With the unprecedented scaling up of PrEP access in many states over the last few years, we have observed a surge in PrEP use, and increasing levels of support for PrEP in the community. Belief in the effectiveness of TasP has also increased, although many men remain skeptical about it. The report includes national summary data. it is hoped that the report will be useful in assessing community readiness for biomedical prevention and potential issues in implementation.

Key findings:

» Nearly a quarter of gay and bisexual men (24%) reported they had ever used PrEP. This was a large increase from the 2015 survey (3%).

» Most current PrEP users were accessing it from a research study or demonstration project (82%) and the majority (74%) reported increased sexual confidence and reduced concern about acquiring HIV as a result of PrEP.

» Nearly all participants (95%) had heard of PrEP and two-thirds of participants (66%) knew someone who had taken PrEP; substantial increases from the 2015 survey. Knowledge of PrEP also improved between 2015 and 2017.

» Willingness to use PrEP has increased among HIV-negative and untested men (to 37% in 2017) and concern about using it has fallen (to 36%).

» Support for gay and bisexual men using PrEP increased to 75% in 2017, as did willingness to have sex with someone using PrEP (47%).

» Belief that HIV treatment prevents transmission increased to 20% in 2017; the increase was primarily among HIV-negative and untested men.

» Agreement that early HIV treatment is necessary increased to 79% in 2017; this increase was concentrated among HIV-positive men

What is going on in gay men’s lives when they acquire HIV?

nam/aidsmap, Published: 08 September 2017

Gay men in England who have recently become HIV positive describe a complex web of factors which may have contributed to their infection, according to a qualitative study recently published in BMJ Open.

“Individuals who experienced multiple stressors, gradually over the life course or more suddenly, were especially vulnerable to HIV and being drawn into sexual risk situations, while the social environment created a context that enabled risk of HIV infection,” the researchers write. Individual and interpersonal factors frequently combined with community or structural factors, such as the widespread use of dating apps, chemsex and HIV treatment, as well as changing perceptions of the seriousness of an HIV infection.