Adelaide abortion clinic calls for safe access from protesters

InDaily,  31/5/19

Staff at an Adelaide abortion clinic have called for safe access zone laws due to pro-life supporters they claim stand near the centre, holding placards and photographing and filming people entering and leaving.

Unlike New South Wales, Northern Territory, Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, Tasmania and Victoria, South Australia has no safe access zone laws that restrict protests and other activities outside abortion clinics.

 

Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sorting it out: Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), Western Sydney University & ACON, May 2019

This research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (GBTIQ) men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault (SA) was undertaken in 2017-2018.

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), at Western Sydney University was commissioned to undertake the survey by ACON (formerly known as AIDS Council of New South Wales), who collaborated in the survey design and analysis. An online survey was completed by 895 GBTIQ-identifying men, primarily focusing on IPV in same-sex relationships.

However, the survey included questions about SA, with some men providing additional
information on SA in the open-ended questions in the survey.

The survey did not ask specific questions about criminal victimisation or perpetration in relationships but was instead focused on men’s views and experiences of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Overview of findings:
• GBTIQ men want healthy and safe relationships for themselves, their friends and community.
• GBTIQ men are certain about the illegality and unacceptability of sexual assault and
domestic violence

One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

People with disability are more likely to be victims of crime – here’s why

The Conversation, February 22, 2019 6.06am AEDT

Some of our most vulnerable citizens have been beaten, raped, and even killed at the hands of those supposedly caring for them.

The statistics are alarming. Up to 90% of women with disability have been sexually assaulted. And people with disability are three times as likely to die prematurely than the general population from causes that could have been prevented with better quality care.

But to provide victims with justice, we need to better understand why people with disabilities are more vulnerable to abuse and assault.

New report about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s experience of violence

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 19 February 2019

The extent of family and domestic violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women has been revealed in a new Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) report using previously unpublished data from the 2014-15 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey. 

ABS Director of the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, Debbie Goodwin said “Of those women who had experienced violence, more than two-thirds (72 per cent) identified an intimate partner or family member as a perpetrator in their most recent experience. This was twice the rate reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men (35 per cent).

New Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics Directory

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 19 December 2018

For the first time, sources of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics have been collated into a central directory by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The new ‘Directory of Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics’ aims to improve the awareness and utilisation of family, domestic, and sexual violence statistics by providing an integrated repository of national and state and territory data sources.