“I never realised they were so different”: understanding the impact of the labia library

Women’s Health Victoria, October 2018

Recognising that women are increasingly altering their genitalia through cosmetic surgery, WHV developed the Labia Library, a unique online resource that supports positive body image by informing women about the natural diversity in normal female genital appearance.

The Labia Library houses a gallery of 40 unaltered photographs of female genitalia.
This provides viewers with the opportunity to learn about the diversity of normal female
genitalia and make visual comparisons, in a safe and private way. The site also contains information about anatomy, female genital cosmetic surgery, hair removal, media literacy and pornography.

In order to gain an understanding of the effectiveness of the resource in improving
women’s health literacy, a survey with a free text option was promoted on the Labia
Library home page from September 2013 to July 2015

Overall, the vast majority of survey respondents indicated a positive perception
of the resource, often experiencing a significant reduction in anxiety and
reassurance of normality associated with genital appearance.

 

Exploring psychosocial predictors of STI testing in University students

BMC Public Health, 2018 18:664, Published: 29 May 2018

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5587-2

Abstract:

Background

To explore university students’ Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) testing knowledge, psychosocial and demographic predictors of past STI testing behaviour, intentions to have an STI test, and high risk sexual behaviour, to inform interventions promoting STI testing in this population.

Methods

A cross-sectional, quantitative online survey was conducted in March 2016, recruiting university students from North East Scotland via an all-student email. The anonymous questionnaire assessed student demographics (e.g. sex, ethnicity, age), STI testing behaviours, sexual risk behaviours, knowledge and five psychological constructs thought to be predictive of STI testing from theory and past research: attitudes, perceived susceptibility to STIs, social norms, social fear and self-efficacy.

Results

The sample contained 1294 sexually active students (response rate 10%) aged 18–63, mean age = 23.61 (SD 6.39), 888 (69%) were female. Amongst participants, knowledge of STIs and testing was relatively high, and students held generally favourable attitudes. 52% reported ever having an STI test, 13% intended to have one in the next month; 16% reported unprotected sex with more than one ‘casual’ partner in the last six months. Being female, older, a postgraduate, longer UK residence, STI knowledge, perceived susceptibility, subjective norms, attitudes and self-efficacy all positively predicted past STI testing behaviour (p < 0.01). Perceived susceptibility to STIs and social norms positively predicted intentions to have an STI test in the next month (p  < 0.05); perceived susceptibility also predicted past high-risk sexual behaviour (p < 0.01).

Conclusions

Several psychosocial predictors of past STI testing, of high-risk sexual behaviour and future STI intentions were identified. Health promotion STI testing interventions could focus on male students and target knowledge, attitude change, and increasing perceived susceptibility to STIs, social norms and self-efficacy towards STI-testing.

It’s not just the mechanics … children need lessons in life and love

The Guardian, Sunday 5 March 2017

The radical overhaul of sex and relationships education (SRE) announced by the [UK] government last week is very good news. Children will learn about healthy adult relationships from the age of four and sex education will become compulsory in all secondary schools. So, good news – but also long overdue, given the challenges faced by the young.

Read more here 

 

Forum: Porn literacy: raising sexually intelligent young people

SHine SA, October 2016

In the words of Dr Marty Klein, Licensed Sex Therapist, Writer and Speaker: “In addition to death and taxes, there are two other things we can be sure of:  The internet is here to stay. Pornography is here to stay.”

With that in mind, join us at our ReFRESH Forum as we discuss the need to equip our young people with the essential skills and strategies to critique, understand and de-code what they see (be it accidental or purposeful viewing).

The session includes discussion time and practical tips.

When: 11 November 2016 (Friday)
Where: SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time: 2.00 – 4.00 pm
Cost: $50 (Student Concession $25)
Afternoon tea provided.

REGISTRATION:
Online enrolment: www.shinesa.org.au/events/refresh-forums
Closing date for enrolment: Wednesday 9 November
Enquiries Phone 8300 5300 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Download flyer (PDF) here:refresh-porn-literacy

Gender and Body Image articles – free access until, end of September

Taylor & Francis Publishing, 13th July 2015

As summer approaches, inevitably discussions concerning body image become prevalent. Perpetuated by the media and broadcasted via social media, a variety of sociological and psychological issues become projected into the public conscious. To recognise these issues from the perspective of gender, Taylor & Francis have compiled a collection of articles based on the below topics, available to read for free until the end of September 2015.

Access articles here

The Role Of Alcohol Use In Sexual Assault

Kinsey Institute, April 28, 2015
In her widely cited article, “Alcohol-Related Sexual Assault: A Common Problem among College Students,” Antonia Abbey, Ph.D. dived into the complex relationship between alcohol and sexual assault. Abbey proposed ten causal pathways that continue to capture the relationship between alcohol and sexual assault.
Read more here