Increased screening for syphilis and HIV in SA – new advice for clinicians (video)

SHINE SA,  

SHINE SA have released a short video resource for health professionals providing advice on the current syphilis outbreak in South Australia.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). It presents a serious public health issue as it causes harm to the developing foetus and increases the transmission and acquisition of HIV.

The 5 minute video SA Syphilis Outbreak – Advice for Clinicians urges health professionals to be aware that syphilis is increasing rapidly in SA and that there is a need to respond with increased screening.

Update on Sexually Transmitted Infections: forum recording now available

SHINE SA, 17/1/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of sexually transmitted infections. This recording is available free of charge, and access is limited to three months only.

This forum covers current trends in sexually transmitted infections and includes recent updates to the Australian STI Management Guidelines for Use in Primary Care.

Presenter: Dr Tonia Mezzini, Sexual Health Physician.

Recording length: 1 hour 25 minutes.

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum.

To watch the recording click here and sign in – or set up a new account at https://shinesa.trainingvc.com.au/Under ‘Course Categories’ click Clinical Education to find the course STI Update, and then click Enrol Me.

 

Evaluation of Chlamydia Partner Notification Practices and Use of the “Let Them Know” website by Family Planning Clinicians in Australia

Journal of Medical Internet Research, Published on 24.06.16 in Vol 18, No 6 (2016)

Background: Chlamydia, caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, is the most common reportable infection in many developed countries. Testing, treatment, and partner notification (PN) are key strategies for chlamydia control. In 2008 the Let Them Know (LTK) PN website was established, which provided means for people to send anonymous PN messages by text messaging (short message service, SMS), email, or letter.

Objective: We evaluated PN practices among Australian family planning clinicians following chlamydia diagnosis and assessed how often clinicians refer their patients to the LTK website.

Methods: A mixed methods approach included a Web-based cross-sectional survey of Australian family planning clinicians to examine PN attitudes and practices and focus groups to explore the context of LTK website use.

Results: Between May 2012 and June 2012, all clinicians from 29 different family planning services (n=212) were invited to complete the survey, and 164 participated (response rate=77.4%); of the clinicians, 96.3% (158/164) were females, 56.1% (92/164) nurses, and 43.9% (72/164) doctors. More than half (62.2%, 92/148) agreed that PN was primarily the client’s responsibility; however, 93.2% (138/148) agreed it was the clinician’s responsibility to support the client in informing their partners by providing information or access to resources. Almost half (49.4%, 76/154) of the clinicians said that they always or usually referred clients to the LTK website, with variation across clinics in Australian states and territories (0%-77%). Eleven focus groups among 70 clinicians at 11 family planning services found that the LTK website had been integrated into routine practice; that it was particularly useful for clients who found it difficult to contact partners; and that the LTK letters and fact sheets were useful. However, many clinicians were not aware of the website and noted a lack of internal clinic training about LTK.

Conclusions: The LTK website has become an important PN tool for family planning clinicians. The variation in referral of patients to the LTK website and lack of awareness among some clinicians suggest further promotion of the website, PN training, and clinic protocols are warranted.

Fulll text (open access) here

Gene sequencing offers way to beat global spread of gonorrhoea

Oxford University, 12 July 2016

With drug-resistant strains of sexually-transmitted infection gonorrhoea increasing, scientists from Brighton, Oxford University and Public Health England have found that genetic sequencing can track the spread of infection. They show coordinated national and international strategies are required to stop drug-resistance spreading further.

Their study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and the NIHR Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU), is published in The Lancet Infectious Disease.

Read more here

STI & BBV Testing Tool for GPs in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

NSW Health, May 2016

The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC) and the NSW STI Programs Unit (NSW STIPU) have released a new resource for GPs and other professionals in NSW working with Aboriginal people around sexual health.

The tool includes information on when to consider STI and blood borne virus testing, as well as information on contact tracing.

Download tool (PDF,  2 pages) here:  GP-Card-May-2016_web

 

 

SA Health updates Gonorrhoea treatment guideline

May 2016

Responding to antimicrobial resistant gonorrhoea in the community, SA Health have updated their gonococcal treatment guidelines.

The updated Gonorrhoea diagnosis and management guidelines from SA Health can be found here