UNESCO paper busts myths about comprehensive sexuality education

UNESCO, 2019

Comprehensive sexuality education is an essential part of a good quality education that improves sexual and reproductive health, argues Facing the Facts, a new policy paper by the Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report at UNESCO that seeks to dispel social and political resistance to sexuality education in many countries.

Globally, each year, 15 million girls marry before the age of 18, some 16 million 15-19 year olds and one million girls under 15 give birth. Young people moreover account for a third of new HIV infections among adults and across 37 low and middle-income countries, yet only approximately one third of people aged 15-24 years have comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission.

Free legal resources for young trans & gender diverse people

Justice Connect, 2019

Justice Connect have released a suite of free legal resources for young trans & gender diverse people and their families. These are available state by state to make it easier to understand the different legalities between each state and territory.

I looked at 100 best-selling picture books: female protagonists were largely invisible

Sarah Mokrzycki, The Conversation, June 3, 2019 6.08am AEST

In April 2019, I examined the 100 bestselling picture books at Australian book retailer Dymocks: an almost 50/50 mix of modern and classic stories (the majority being published in the past five years).

I discovered that despite the promising evolution of the rebel girl trend, the numbers tell us that picture books as a whole remain highly gendered and highly sexist. Worse – female protagonists remain largely invisible.

How we tackle gender in picture books is important, as they help inform children’s understanding of the world and themselves.

 

Condom handouts in schools prevent disease without encouraging sex

The Guardian,

Making condoms available to teenagers at school does not make them more promiscuous – but neither does it reduce teenage pregnancy rates.

According to a major review by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), giving out condoms in secondary schools does not increase sexual activity, or encourage young people to have sex at an earlier age.

The research, thought to be the largest review of scientific literature on the issue, found that introducing condoms to schools reduced sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Rules about sex: getting them right – upcoming training day

SHINE SA, September 2018

This stand-alone workshop introduces participants to a wide range of education resources that may be borrowed from SHINE SA and provides permanent access to an electronic resource on CD that can be applied immediately in the workplace.

The CD based resource has been produced to assist workers and carers to assess knowledge and teach rules about touch and sexual behaviour and strategies for sexual safety and improved relationships.

In this practical full-day module, you will be supported to apply the resource practically and ethically, using your own laptop.

The aims are to:
> reduce sexual victimisation of people with disability
> reduce the incidence of sexual behaviours which may cause offence to others
> prevent vulnerable people with a disability from involvement with the law and possible long-term consequences of this

Suitable participants include: developmental educators, service coordinators, special
education workers, therapists, disability advocates, police and parents.

Important: Please bring a laptop computer with a CD drive, installed with MS Word,
MS Powerpoint, or equivalent. An external plug-in mouse will be an advantage.

Details:
When – Monday 22 October 2018
Where – SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time – 9:30am – 4:30pm
Cost – $175

 

Australian sex education isn’t diverse enough. Here’s why we should follow England’s lead.

The Conversation, 7 August 2018

By David Rhodes, Senior Lecturer, School of Education, Edith Cowan University

How children are taught about sex, relationships and sexuality at school is shaping up to be a political hot potato in Australia (again).

It’s already been slated to be an issue in the Victorian state elections later this year. That’s just a short time from being on the agenda during the same-sex marriage debate.

Now a radical shift in how children in England are taught about sex, relationships and sexuality promises to be the biggest reform of its kind in nearly 20 years. Here’s what Australia can learn from the new English system.