Media release from SHINE SA: Teen Pregnancy

SHINE SA, Issued: 25 May 2018

Following the release of the Australian Institute of Health and Wellbeing’s Report, that includes the latest figures on teen birth-rates, SHINE SA believes that a decrease in the teen birth-rate as indicated in the report, is a positive outcome from the study.

“A decrease may reflect better sexual health information for young people including education in schools, and better access to sexual health services”, said Dr Amy Moten, Coordinator, Medical Education at SHINE SA.

“Increased access to Long Acting reversible Contraception for young people, as promoted by Family Planning Alliance Australia, is also a significant factor in reducing teen pregnancy rates”, Dr Moten said.

Low socio-economic status can be a marker of poor health outcomes overall. This increases with remoteness from metropolitan areas and Indigenous status. This has been shown in previous studies and also is supported by national data regarding cervical screening that shows that low socio-economic and Indigenous status reduces the rate of screening compared to people from a higher socioeconomic areas.

Social determinants of health are linked to social and economic factors that influence health. Young people from a lower socioeconomic area are likely to have poorer health literacy, lower levels of education and poorer access to health services including contraception. These have all been shown to be linked to an increased birth rate over all ages. Barriers to access health and contraceptive services such as cost and availability of these services increase with distance from metropolitan areas.

“Generally, teen mums often face increased stigma about being a parent and should be supported in their decision to continue parenting”, Dr Moten said.

“At SHINE SA, we provide pregnancy testing, counselling and advice. When a young person is pregnant they can discuss their options and be referred to appropriate services. For a young person continuing to parent we would refer them to the Metropolitan Youth Health Service for example, which has a Young Parenting program”, Dr Moten said.

SHINE SA believes that young mums should be supported to continue their education as completing secondary school after pregnancy has been shown to improve long term outcomes in both mother and child.

Dr Amy Moten, Coordinator Medical Education, SHINE SA
Issued: 25 May 2018

 

Summary of results: Trans Pathways: the mental health experiences and care pathways of trans young people

Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, September 1, 2017

Trans Pathways is the largest study ever conducted of the mental health and care pathways of trans and gender diverse young people in Australia (859 participants). It is also the first Australian study to incorporate the views of parents and guardians of trans young people (194 participants).

What did Trans Pathways tell us?

  • Trans young people are at very high risk for poor mental health, self-harming and suicide attempts
  • Trans young people found it difficult to access health services
  • Many trans young people have experienced negative situations that affect their mental health such as peer rejection, bullying, issues with school, university or TAFE, and a lack of family support
  • Participants told us they used music and art, peers and friends, activism, social media and pets to make themselves feel better and take care of their mental wellbeing

The authors have provided a list of recommendations for governments and health providers, as well as guidance for schools, parents, peers and young trans people.

Download report:

If you or anyone you know needs help:

Young Parents’ Fight To Keep Baby Aria Reignites Debate Over Teenage Parents

The Conversation, 19/04/2017 10:04 AM AEST | Updated 20/04/2017 10:53 AM AEST

Two New South Wales teenagers’ fight to get their baby daughter back has reignited debate over teenage pregnancy, and how young is too young to care for a child.

While experts may agree that teen pregnancies are less than ideal, there is disagreement about what should happen in the case of the young couple — some saying authorities made the right decision, while others argue that Jayden and Jenifer should have been supported in caring for their daughter.

Pregnancy Choices Training at SHine SA

SHine SA, 14 July, 2015

This two-day course, developed for professionals, defines and explains all the options available to women experiencing an unplanned pregnancy.

It is open to nurses, doctors, counsellors, community health workers, school counsellors, youth workers, indigenous health workers, and any professional who encounters clients with unplanned pregnancy.

This course includes:
• Global, national and local overview
• Exploration of pregnancy options
• Genetic issues in pregnancy
• Counselling responses to unplanned pregnancy
• Application to practice

When 27–28 July, 2015

Where SHine SA, GP PLus Health Care Centre,
64c Woodville Road, Woodville

(Parking off Bower Street)

Cost $300 (10% off if registered 2 months ahead)

Enquiries Tel: 8300 5317 E mail: shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Further Information and registration here

Flyer (PDF) here:  PCT flyer 2015

Study finds that risk of suicide in transgender community may be reduced by changing policy and societal factors

HealthCanal, 9/6/2015

Researchers have determined that policy and societal changes may prevent  thousands of transgender adults in Ontario from attempting or seriously considering suicide.

  • Read more of the press release here
  • Read the academic paper here