Do Estrogen Therapies Affect Sexual Function in Early Postmenopause?

JAMA Internal Medicine, 2017

Transdermal estrogen therapy delivered through the skin modestly improved sexual function in early postmenopausal women, according to an article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Declining estrogen levels around the menopausal transition are commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, which can be an important determinant of women’s health and quality of life.

In the new article, Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., of the Yale School of Medicine, and his coauthors report on an ancillary study of a clinical trial that examined changes in sexual function in recently postmenopausal women.

 

Design Agency ‘Frog’ Redesigns The Dreaded Gynecology Exam

co.design

Cold metal. Eerie clicking sound. Torturous duck-billed shape. Yes, I’m talking about the speculum, the anxiety-inducing device that doctors use to check  vaginal health. Despite its status as an instrument of discomfort and its dark history–involving a doctor who experimented on slave women – the speculum remains to this day one of the centerpieces of the often dreaded annual pelvic exam.

A team of four designers at the global design agency Frog is on a mission to redesign it – and reimagine what it means to go to the gynecologist in the first place.

Essure contraceptive device: Hazard Alert from TGA

Therapeutic Goods Administration, August 30, 2017

Consumers and health professionals are advised that Australasian Medical and Science Ltd (AMSL), in consultation with the TGA, has issued a hazard alert for Essure. AMSL is also recallingunused stock and withdrawing the device from the Australian market.

The battle over Essure

The Washington Post, Published on July 26, 2017

Nobody can say exactly how many women have had Essure implanted since the device went on the market in 2002. Bayer, which is headquartered in Germany, says that more than 750,000 devices have been sold worldwide and that sales “continue to grow.” 

In recent years, the [US] Food and Drug Administration has received more than 16,000 adverse-event reports about Essure. These are official reports about symptoms, hospitalizations or diagnoses that patients, doctors, hospitals or a device manufacturer believe are associated with a device.

“It seems every two or three years we have another controversy in women’s health,” says Steve Xu, a health-­policy researcher and Northwestern University dermatology resident.

 

First medical study on chest binding recently published

The first medical study on chest binding transgender and non-binary people was published last year. 

The researchers hope that the study will provide an initial roadmap for change, educating physicians on the benefits and impacts of binding and allowing those who bind to take charge of their health. They scoured peer-reviewed literature and information from health clinics, LGBTQ organizations, and online community resources, coming up with 28 potential health outcomes from binding. 1,800 respondents answered an online survey with questions ranging from how often they bound, what they used to bind their chests with, and their gender identity.

  • Read more about the study and chest-binding here 
  • Read study abstract here (for full text, see your librarian)

Results of the Jean Hailes Women’s Health Survey 2016

Jean Hailes for Women’s Health, August 2016

In 2016, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health conducted the second annual Women’s Health Survey to understand the health information needs and behaviours of women living in Australia.

The survey set out to explore the health information needs of women and also identify trends in health behaviours, body image, mental health and health screening behaviours.
The 2016 Jean Hailes Women’s Health Survey was a national survey of 3236 women and health professionals of differing ages, cultural backgrounds and from a range of metropolitan, regional, rural and remote locations across Australia.
A selection of the key findings are outlined below:
Health concerns and information needs
• Women reported five main health concerns. These health concerns included weight
management, female-specific cancers, mental and emotional health, menopause and chronic pain.
• Nearly half of all women reported that they wanted more information on healthy eating and nutrition. Women also reported they wanted more information on mental health, weight management and memory.
• Women residing in metropolitan locations reported different health information needs to
women in regional and rural Australia.
Health checks and screening
• On average women visited the doctor 3-5 times per year, with only a small number of women not visiting the doctor at all in the last 12 months.
• Most women felt confident to ask their doctor questions and discuss health issues that were of concern. Only a small group reported that they were not confident to ask questions.
• Health professionals reported family violence, followed by painful sex and sexual health problems as health topics that their female patients found difficult to discuss.
• Most women reported engaging in general health checks as well as pap screening, breast screening and bowel screening. However, many women reported that they were not engaging in sexual health screening for STIs.
Download report (PDF) here