New ‘Syphilis Is Still Out There’ Campaign for Health Professionals

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) & SHINE SA, May 2020

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) and SHINE SA have released a new social media campaign for health professionals.

The campaign aims to raise awareness of syphilis screening and treatment during COVID-19.

  • Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign for Health Professionals

While we deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the syphilis outbreak in South Australia continues. It’s essential that we continue to test, treat, cure and notify partners during this time.

To learn more visit www.shinesa.org.au/syphilisoutbreak

  • Social Media Tiles and Posters

To help support this campaign and reinforce key messages around syphilis prevention and treatment, we have a range of social media tiles and posters to download.

Help us share this campaign by downloading our social media tiles to share on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn. Use the hashtag #SyphilisIsStillOutThere

Download the files here as a zipped folder: Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign

Key Messages of this Campaign 

  • Syphilis is still out there #SyphilisIsStillOutThere
  • Syphilis outbreak minimised in 4 steps: test, treat, cure and notify partners
  • Syphilis is still threatening unborn children. Know when to test before, during and after pregnancy

  • For the Community

Stay tuned: whilst this campaign is aimed at health professionals, AHCSA are currently producing resources to share on social media targeted towards community members.

To stay up-to-date follow AHCSA on Facebook.

 

Webinar: Syphilis Outbreak in the Indigenous Community

SHINE SA, posted May 14, 2020

This free education session is presented by Adelaide Sexual Health Centre and will provide an update on syphilis.

General practitioners, nurses and/or midwives, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Health Workers are encouraged to register for this training.

COURSE DETAILS

Date: 16 June 2020
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm

The webinar will cover:

  • Update on epidemiology
  • Review of diagnosis, staging and management of syphilis cases
  • How to interpret syphilis serology
  • Syphilis in pregnancy
  • Approaches to Partner Notification
  • Introduction to the South Australian Syphilis Register

Presenters:
Dr Alison Ward, Senior Consultant Sexual Health Physician
Njirrah Rowe, Aboriginal STI Education Coordinator and Partner Notification Officer

This activity is pending RACGP approval for 4 CPD activity points

This session is part of the Syphilis Outbreak Response and is a partnership between SHINE SA and Adelaide Sexual Health Centre.

No cost to attend.

NEW Fact Sheet for Health Professionals – Contraception During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

SHINE SA, 15/4/2020

SHINE SA have released a new Fact Sheet for health professionals: Contraception During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Contraception is an essential service during the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes the provision of emergency contraception, access to long acting reversible contraception (LARC) and management of complications of LARC. Health professionals can continue to facilitate access to contraception via telehealth consults and limited face-to-face consultations where possible.

This Fact Sheet provides advice for health professionals on the provision and management of contraception during the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes LARC, combined hormonal contraception, emergency contraception, progestogen only pill and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA).

Nurse Practitioner (s100) Prescribing Change

Hepatitis Australia, 3 April 2020

Hepatitis Australia warmly welcomes recent changes to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) allowing authorised Nurse Practitioners to prescribe hepatitis B and hepatitis C medicines under the Highly Specialised Drugs (s100) Program.

Both hepatitis B and hepatitis C are under-treated and without improvement in a range of areas Australia risks falling short of agreed national and global viral hepatitis elimination goals. Expanded access to timely treatment and care is a critical component of the national response.

This important development acknowledges the clinical expertise of Nurse Practitioners and the therapeutic relationships they develop and maintain with highly stigmatised and often vulnerable populations.

Under previous arrangements, authorised Nurse Practitioners were able to prescribe treatments for hepatitis B and hepatitis C under the PBS General Schedule (s85). Where Nurse Practitioners were available in primary care services, this arrangement enhanced access to antiviral therapies in community settings.

From 1 April 2020, authorised Nurse Practitioners are also able to prescribe hepatitis B and hepatitis C treatments under the Highly Specialised Drugs (s100) Program. This matters because some people are not able to access primary care settings. The change therefore improves the availability of treatment for vulnerable populations such as people living in remote and regional areas, people experiencing homelessness, and people in custodial settings.

Hepatitis Australia congratulates the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee for recommending this important change, and we thank our colleagues at ASHM (Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine) for their leadership in this matter.

Community members in need of more information about hepatitis B and hepatitis C may wish to contact 1800 437 222 (1800 HEP ABC). This National Hepatitis Infoline directs callers to the community-based hepatitis organisation in the relevant state or territory.

ASHM’s “Find a Prescriber” function helps community members find a Doctor or Nurse Practitioner who has attended ASHM’s hepatitis training. People can also speak to their GP about treatment.

https://ashm.org.au/news/pbac-endorse-np-prescribing-for-hepatitis-b-hepatitis-c-and-hiv-medicines/

and

http://www.pbs.gov.au/info/news/2020/04/authorised-nurse-practitioners-now-eligible-to-prescribe

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The above information was found here 

Position Statement on LARC access during the COVID-19 pandemic

SHINE SA, April 7, 2020

SHINE SA, along with Family Planning VictoriaFamily Planning NTFamily Planning TasmaniaSexual Health and Family Planning ACTSexual Health Quarters, and True Relationships & Reproductive Health have co-signed a Position Statement on LARC access during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Extended use of and ongoing access to LARCs during the COVID-19 pandemic

Provision of contraception is essential during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent unintended pregnancies. This is particularly important for individuals most at risk, including young people due to their high levels of fertility, people with serious health conditions, and for those who are post-abortion. Long Acting Reversible Contraceptive methods (LARCs) are more effective than shorter acting methods and increased community access and uptake is associated with lower abortion rates.

Ongoing access to LARC insertion is essential during the pandemic

Contraception is essential health care and all efforts should be made to continue the insertion of LARCs during the pandemic. To reduce the risk of infection with COVID-19, this may require different approaches to insertion such as a wearing mask during insertion of contraceptive implant or using an inserter-only approach for IUD insertion (with an assistant outside the room for emergencies).

Summary of recommendations during the pandemic

  • All efforts should be made to continue access to insertion of LARCs during the pandemic, particularly for younger people, people with serious health conditions, and post-abortion
  • The etonogestrel implant (Implanon NXT) can be extended off-label for use up to 4 years
  • The 52mg LNG IUD (Mirena) can be extended off-label for use up to 6 years
  • The 19.5mg LNG IUD (Kyleena) cannot be extended beyond 5 years
  • Standard sized T shaped banded copper IUDs can be extended off-label for use up to 12 years
  • 5-year copper IUDs (Load 375 and Copper T short) can be extended off-label for use up to 6 years
  • Additional use of condoms and/or a contraceptive pill should be discussed with users for whom the risk of an unintended pregnancy is unacceptable during extended use.

 

Early medical abortion: reflections on current practice

O&G Magazine (RANZCOG), by Dr Lisa Rasmussen

In the last 30 years, medical abortion has globally become an established, safe and straightforward method for pregnancies of less than nine weeks gestation. It is now recommended by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists as the method of choice for women up to nine weeks gestation.

The reality of providing medical abortion for women, however, is a more complex matter. Abortion services are contextualised by the specific and, at times, changing abortion laws in each country and state. These laws, in turn, are determined and maintained by each jurisdiction’s specific gendered social and political histories, practices and attitudes.

In Australia and New Zealand, this context continues to affect who can provide medical abortions, the models of care adopted, the ongoing struggle to provide affordable and accessible care to all women, and the level to which medical abortion is accepted as a normal and important part of women’s healthcare.

Within the context of these histories and challenges, this article will attempt to guide you through the process of providing a medical abortion as a health practitioner.