What Is the Optimal Time to Retest Patients With a Urogenital Chlamydia Infection? (RCT)

Sex Transm Dis. 2018 Feb;45(2):132-137. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000706.

BACKGROUND:

Chlamydia trachomatis is a common, often recurring sexually transmitted infection, with serious adverse outcomes in women. Current guidelines recommend retesting after a chlamydia infection, but the optimum timing is unknown. We assessed the optimal retest interval after urogenital chlamydia treatment.

METHODS:

A randomized controlled trial among urogenital chlamydia nucleic acid amplification test positive heterosexual clients of the Amsterdam sexually transmitted infection clinic. After treatment, patients were randomly assigned for retesting 8, 16, or 26 weeks later. Patients could choose to do this at home (and send a self-collected sample by mail) or at the clinic. Retest uptake and chlamydia positivity at follow-up were calculated.

RESULTS:

Between May 2012 and March 2013, 2253 patients were included (45% men; median age, 23 years; interquartile range, 21-26). The overall uptake proportion within 35 weeks after the initial visit was significantly higher in the 8-week group (77%) compared with the 16- and 26-week groups (67% and 64%, respectively, P < 0.001), and the positivity proportions among those retested were comparable (P = 0.169). The proportion of people with a diagnosed recurrent chlamydia infection among all randomized was similar between the groups (n = 69 [8.6%], n = 52 [7.4%], and n = 69 [9.3%]; P = 0.4).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with a recent urogenital chlamydia are at high risk of recurrence of chlamydia and retesting them is an effective way of detecting chlamydia cases. We recommend inviting patients for a re-test 8 weeks after the initial diagnosis and treatment.

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Healthcare workers living with HIV have different motivations for disclosing/concealing their status

nam/aidsmap, 10 November 2017

Nurses and other healthcare workers who are living with HIV have mixed reactions when they mention their HIV status to colleagues, according to a small Dutch study reported in the November/December issue of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. 

Some healthcare workers disclosed because they expected a positive reaction or they felt the need to share a secret. Others concealed their HIV status because they feared a negative reaction or did not believe that disclosure was relevant or necessary.

Let’s talk about sex: why do we need good sex education? – podcast transcript

The Guardian, Wednesday 15 June 2016

There are 1.8 billion people aged 10 to 24 today, but how many of those are getting comprehensive sexuality education? And why, in 2016, are there still so many taboos around sex? Liz Ford discusses what young people should be taught, when sex education should start and asks, what does comprehensive sexuality education actually mean?

She visits the Women Deliver Conference in Denmark, where 5,000 delegates meet to discuss the reproductive health, rights and wellbeing of women and girls. There, she speaks to 18-year-old Dennis Glasgow, a peer educator from the Guyana Responsible Parenthood Association, who discusses the importance of diminishing the myths around sex by talking about it.

Doortje Braeken, senior adviser on adolescents and young people at the International Planned Parenthood Federation, reveals that 66% of girls don’t know what menstruation is when they have their first period.

Lucy Emmerson is coordinator of the UK’s Sex Education Forum. She says that, with good quality sex and relationship education from a trained educator, young people are less likely to start having sex at a young age, and less likely to become teenage parents. The Sex Education Forum has developed a curriculum framework that shows the kind of questions relevant to children at each stage of their development.

Remmy Shawa helps manage sex and reproductive health at Sonke Gender Justice in South Africa. He talks about the difficulties for parents in being open with children about sexuality when they can’t find the language to talk about it.

Anne Philpott, founder of The Pleasure Project, emphasises the need to convey in public health messages that sex is about enjoyment. She talks about the ease of young people’s access to pornography – essentially bad sex education, she says – and the need to discuss the stereotypes it presents, so that young people understand it’s not real life. And, Philpott says, with AIDS still the highest killer of adolescent girls in Africa, effectively spreading the message of safe sex is a top priority.

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  • Listen to podcast here

The case for starting sex education in kindergarten

PBS Newshour, May 27, 2015 at 1:44 PM EDT

Welcome to “Spring Fever” week in primary schools across the Netherlands, the week of focused sex ed classes … for 4-year olds.

Of course, it’s not just for 4-year-olds. Eight-year-olds learn about self-image and gender stereotypes. 11-year-olds discuss sexual orientation and contraceptive options. But in the Netherlands, the approach, known as “comprehensive sex education,” starts as early as age 4.

Read more here

Australia performs best in HIV treatment cascade – 62% with undetectable viral load

nam, 04 November 2014

Australia and northern European countries are doing far better than North America at retaining people living with HIV in care and achieving viral suppression, according to a comprehensive survey of `treatment cascades` in high-income countries presented on Tuesday at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection in Glasgow.

Read more here

Multiple Drug Use Raises Infection Risk for ‘Swinging’ Couples

Medline Plus, Friday, October 24, 2014

Multiple drug use put couples who “swing” at increased risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), a new study shows.

Read more here