Developing a national LGBTIQ disability strategy – a national consultation

National LGBTI Health Alliance, March 2017

  • Are you an LGBTIQ* person living with disability?
  • Are you the intimate partner/carer for an LGBTIQ person living with disability?
  • Would you like to ensure your lived experience contributes to guiding the work of the National Disability Insurance Agency [NDIA] into the future?

*Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, or Queer

How to get involved:  

Step One: Apply to attend the Lived Experience Forum in Melbourne on 31 March
Step Two: Click here to complete the online survey before March 31
Step Three: Share this page with your friends!

About the Consultation

The LGBTI Health Alliance, in partnership with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), is conducting a nationwide consultation that will contribute to the development of an LGBTIQ Strategy. This Strategy will guide the work of the NDIA in the coming years and help to ensure that LGBTIQ people and communities can access and benefit from the National Disability Insurance Scheme [NDIS].

The consultation has two parts: A survey and a Lived Experience Forum

  1. The Lived Experience Forum

The Lived Experience Forum will bring together LGBTIQ people living with disability from around Australia for an in-person meeting with the NDIA in Melbourne. This is an incredibly important opportunity for LGBTIQ people who live with disability to meet with the NDIA and share their wisdom gained from personal experience. Funding is available to support travel costs.
We call on all LGBTI people living with disabilities, and their intimate partners/carers, to apply to attend this Forum.

Click here to submit your expression of interest

  1. The survey 

The survey will ensure that people from around Australia can contribute their wisdom to this consultation – wherever they are. If required it is also possible to complete the survey by telephone. The survey will take 15-30 minutes to complete and is anonymous.

Click here to complete the survey now

Inquiries: If you have questions about this consultation please contact info@lgbtihealth.org.au or call us on (02) 8568 1123

More sex please: ending barriers in the bedroom [for people with physical disabilities]

Sydney Morning Herald, November 11, 2015

Now 23, Ariane was born with cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia, which means she has reduced muscle tone in parts of her body and uses a wheelchair.

It also means, like many people with physical disabilities, she has relied on assistance in the past to lead a normal adult sexual life; including help getting undressed before hopping into bed with her boyfriend at the time (who also had a physical disability).

“There’s this idea that we’re not allowed to have sex, that it’s gross,” says Ariane.

  • Read more of this article here
  • Read about the Deakin University study here

 

Tjina Maala Message Book For Families: Stories and support for carers of people with a disability

Tjina Maala Centre, WA, August 2015

The Pika Wiya Kuthupa project aims to investigate the needs of Aboriginal families caring for a child with a disability in the Goldfields region of Western Australia. The project established an Aboriginal community reference group, and during 2013 and 2014 conducted ‘storytelling circles’ community consultations. Aboriginal families caring for children with disabilities, schools, health and disability service representatives were invited to share their stories. Families identified the need for culturally appropriate information and support, and culturally safe models of service delivery. The project team is currently developing Aboriginal disability resources, and continues to raise the awareness of Aboriginal views of disability in the disability sector.

This resource is for Aboriginal families/careers of people with a disability. It provides information on disability, people’s response to disability, rights of people with disabilities, support services, the NDIS, and tips & suggestions. Please note that it does not directly address sexuality.

View this resource online here