Network MindOut webinar: The Impact of Bisexual+ Invisibility on Mental Health

National LGBTI Health Alliance, Recorded 24th March 2020

Bisexual+ people are thought to be the largest group in the LGBTIQ+ population, yet are commonly misunderstood by mainstream society and often invisible in the broader LGBTIQ+ discourse. Although many bisexuals are comfortable with, if not proud of their identity, research from around the world tells us that bisexual+ people are more vulnerable to systemic and individual victimisation than lesbians and gays, and mental health outcomes are particularly poor as a result. This webinar will explore the impacts of bisexual+ invisibility on mental health, and will offer practical tips on how to be more inclusive.

Presenter: Misty Farquhar is a PhD Researcher at the Curtin University Centre for Human Rights Education, where they also teach. Misty’s research explores how people living outside binary ideas of sexuality / gender experience recognition in Australia. Misty is extremely active in community outreach, education, and advocacy efforts and is the founder of Bisexual+ Community Perth.

The Ban on ‘Amyl’

Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) recently postponed its decision on whether or not to change the law around alkyl nitrites (the active ingredient in ‘amyl’ or ‘poppers’). Currently, the TGA is conducting public consultations into the proposed amendments that could see amyl recategorised as a ‘prohibited substance’.

The legal consequence of this decision could see amyl fall into the same category as prohibited drugs like heroin, methamphetamine and cocaine, with serious penalties for their possession, use or supply. This issue has raised concerns within our communities where amyl is used during sex.

Submissions to the TGA

The deadline for written submissions to the TGA closed on 15 January 2019; however, a number of organisations expressed their concerns including:

Earlier this month, the Nitrites Action Group (comprised of community health advocates, researchers, and clinicians) released guidelines around community submissions to the TGA.