‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Our Watch, July 18th 2018

Our Watch has today launched a resource aimed at tackling the horrific prevalence of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Changing the picture contains a set of clear actions that are needed to address the many drivers of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and is aimed at encouraging, guiding and supporting a national effort to prevent this violence.

Download report:

Report Changing the picture
Six-page executive summary
Background paper

Read more of article:

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

 

The ‘revolutionary’ programs giving hope to LGBT domestic violence survivors

Updated 

Studies show people in same-sex relationships experience domestic violence at similar — and possibly higher — rates as opposite-sex couples.

But until recently survivors have suffered in silence and worse, been ignored and misunderstood by the health professionals and police who are supposed to help them, because of the persistent stigma and shame surrounding LGBT abuse and misconceptions that especially lesbian couples are immune from it.

Act To Prevent Men’s Violence Against Women A Guide For Community Action

Women’s Health West. 2018

This resource is for community members or groups who are planning to undertake actions to prevent men’s violence against women.

This resource details practical things you can do every day to prevent men’s violence against women. It also includes important information to consider before you take action, as well as links to further resources.

Sex a key part of life for people over 65, study says

Breast cancer screening and cultural barriers: Why some women are missing early detection

ABC, Saturday 3 January, 2018

Some women say it’s fate. Others believe in “God’s will”. Then there are those who simply feel uncomfortable talking about their breasts. When it comes to breast cancer screening in culturally and linguistically diverse communities (CALD), there are varied and complex reasons that can hinder important messages about early detection.

A recent analysis of five studies involving more than 1,700 first-generation Chinese, African, Arabic, Korean and Indian-Australian women found just 19 per cent identified as “breast aware”, and only 27 per cent aged 40 or above had participated in annual clinical breast exams.

Lead researcher Dr Cannas Kwok, who’s been investigating the breast cancer beliefs and attitudes of migrant Australian women since 2005, says the results, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, are concerning.

Sex Industry Network (SIN) events for FEAST festival

SIN, November 2017

SIN is the South Australian Sex Industry Network.

SIN is run by sex workers for sex workers and offers peer support, education, information, advocacy and referral services for sex workers.

SIN has two events scheduled for FEAST. These events are open to the general public.

1. SIN Retrospective

This multimedia retrospective by sex workers showcases projects, posters and artwork exploring the realities of trans, male, female and street-based sex workers across ages and cultural backgrounds.

When: from Thurs 9th- Mon 27th Nov, 11am – 10pm daily

(Opening night is Wed 8th Nov 5:30-7:30)

Where: Upstairs at the Edinburgh Castle Hote

2. Ask a Sex Worker a Question

Step into the Fantasy Brothel confidential confessional and ask a sex worker everything you always wanted to know about sex work but were too afraid to ask.

2 sessions:

Wed 15th Nov
4-6pm and 7-9pm

Wed 22nd Nov
4-6pm and 7-9pm

Where: Upstairs at the Edinburgh Castle Hotel