Call for Papers: Edited Collection on Sexuality and Sexual Identities in Literature for Young People

Deakin University, October 2018

Acknowledging the capacity of literature to reflect and shape significant aspects of human development, this collection of essays takes as its central theme the representation of sexuality and sexual identities in texts for young people. Previous scholarship has established important connections between sexuality and gender, as well as sexuality and queerness, in literature for children and young adults. Investigations have also been made into the way particular genres and individual texts deal with desire, sex and sexuality.

This collection builds upon these individual approaches, while extending out to the analysis of various forms and incarnations of sexuality, across genres, texts and time periods. Keeping sexuality and sexual identities in writing for young people as its core focus, it will include analysis and discussion of representations of heterosexualities, homonormativity, trans subjectivities, asexuality, and the intersections between sexuality and other identity categories such as gender, race and class, across a range of texts and readerships.

The editors therefore welcome abstracts that revisit historical approaches to the study of childhood/adolescence and sexuality in literature, as well as those that provide contemporary and forward-looking models that take account of current and emerging sexual identities. Similarly, they welcome a wide range of theoretical approaches to this subject matter.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

• Sex and sexuality in historical literature for children
• Same-sex desire in young adult fiction from Stonewall to the AIDS era
• Hetero- and homo-normative families in picture books and junior fiction
• “Straightness” in junior and/or young adult fiction
• Queer spaces and queer geographies in writing for young people
• Trans identities in children’s texts
• Intersections between sexuality and race, class, gender, ability, age and/or nationality
• Transnational approaches to sex and sexuality
• Connections between romance narratives and ideologies around sex and sexuality
• Religion/religious themes and sexual morality
• “Post-gay” identities in millennial writing for young people
• The role of genre in depictions of sex and sexuality for young people

  • Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words and a biographical note of up to 150 words to Dr Kristine Moruzi  and Dr Paul Venzo  by December 1, 2018. Full papers of 6000 words will be due by May 1, 2019.

HIV infections in NSW have fallen to their lowest levels — except for one group of people

news.com.au, August 29, 2017

Many people born overseas seem oblivious to efforts to stamp out HIV in Australia. Marco Matillano, an Australian of Filipino descent who has had his own brush with HIV, thinks he know at least part of the answer — bashfulness when it comes to sex.

He said there’s an unwillingness for friends, family — and even people themselves — to discuss sexual health and there remains a lingering “shame” in some Asian people of being honest about becoming infected. This in turn discourages them from seeking out information on HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus.

Mr Matillano said information on the virus should be in different languages, be targeted more directly at Asian-Australians and not be judgmental or lecturing, as they get enough of that at home.

Liz Forsyth: South Australia has some of the country’s most outdated and strictest laws around sex work

Liz Forsyth, CEO of YWCA Adelaide – in The Advertiser, August 2, 2017

SOUTH Australia has some of the most outdated and strictest laws around sex work in the country. However the Bill to decriminalise sex work may soon be before the House of Assembly, having successfully passed the Legislative Council by 13 votes to eight earlier in July.

What will this reform mean? Will sex workers take over our streets? Will we see an increase in sex work in our state? Will the moral fabric of our society be thrown into disrepute?!

What does the Anna Stubblefield case teach us about sentencing and sexual assault?

A former chair of philosophy at Rutgers University had sex with a man who can’t speak. The resulting court battle raised questions about when and why suffering matters in sentencing — and Anna Stubblefield went to jail.

Stubblefield had slept with a man known only by the pseudonym DJ, who has cerebral palsy and to this day has never spoken.

That’s not to say he can’t communicate, though it’s not to say he can, either — that’s what is at issue.

Read more here 

Unplanned pregnancy resources for patients & health professionals

Women’s Health Victoria Clearinghouse Connector,  June 2017

This Clearinghouse Connector focuses on the experience of unplanned pregnancy in Australia and the resources available for women and health professionals to help navigate the decision making process.

Although there is surprisingly little information available about the prevalence of unintended pregnancy in Australia, it has been estimated that half of all pregnancies per year in Australia are unplanned. Outcomes for unplanned pregnancies include parenting, miscarriage, abortion and adoption, with parenting being the most likely outcome and adoption the least likely.

Factors influencing women’s decisions about whether or not to continue a pregnancy include the level of support they are likely to receive, the financial resources they have access to, and their own emotional readiness to become parents. Regardless of whether a woman decides to continue or terminate her pregnancy she will need access to appropriate, sensitive and non-judgmental supports and services.

Lawyers back decriminalisation of sex work [in SA]

Lawyers Weekly, 02 June 2017

The Law Society of South Australia has voiced its support for a bill to decriminalise sex work in the state.

The select committee into the decriminalisation of sex work delivered its final report earlier this week, in the culmination of a two-year consultation process.

After a vote of four to three, the committee recommended that the bill, which will come before the South Australian Legislative Council, should be passed without amendment