TREATY BODIES: FIVE YEARS OF RESEARCH SHOW INTERNATIONAL LAW INCREASINGLY PROTECTS LGBTI PERSONS’ RIGHTS

ASIA PACIFIC ALLIANCE FOR SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS (APA),  2020

The United Nations Treaty Bodies are an authoritative source of international law, and have steadily contributed to protecting the human rights of LGBTI persons. A review of their activities in 2017 and 2018, released by ILGA World, shows that references to sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) made by the committees have hit an all-time high.

The report on  United Nations Treaty Bodies: References to Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Gender Expression and Sex characteristics’ is a comprehensive annual compilation and analysis of all the SOGIESC references made by nine UN Treaty Bodies (CESCR, HRCtee, CEDAW, CRC, CAT, CRPD, CERD, CMW and CED) in 2018, produced by ILGA.
It investigates the Treaty Bodies’ General Comments (interpretations of the international human rights treaties), Individual Communications (complaints brought by individuals or organisations), Lists of Issues (issues and questions sent to the States parties before the main review) and Concluding Observations (country-specific concerns and recommendations).

In 2018, Treaty Bodies made a record high of 138 SOGIESC references and recommendations. This is more than 2.5 times growth from 2014, and active participation of CS groups was one of the important factors contributing to this.  

How did Asia Pacific countries fare?   Here’s all the AP countries under review in 2018, by treaty. 

Highlighted countries received recommendations on LGBTI and/or had civil society reports that mentioned LGBTI :

·         2018 Committee on Economic Social and Cultural Rights :  Bangladesh, New Zealand (read more on p22)

·         2018 Human Right Committee (ICCPR) : Lao 

·         2018 Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women:  Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Lao, Malaysia, Nepal , New Zealand, R of Korea, Samoa  (read more on p. 44)

·         2018 Committee on the Rights of the Child:  Lao, Marshall Islands, Palau, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka (read more on p 57)

·         2018 Committee Against Torture:  [Canada*], Maldives, Russia,  Viet Nam, (read more on p 64)

·         2018 Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Nepal, Philippines, Russia (read more on p 73)

·         2018 Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination: China, Iraq, Japan, Nepal, R of Korea  (read more on p 80)

·         2018 Committee on Migrant Workers:

·         2018 Committee on Enforced Disappearances:  Japan (read more on p 90)

NOTE: Central Asia was not included in the above listing. Canada was included as there is a member organisation there.

 

Responding to LGBT conversion therapy in Australia: report

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University & Human Rights Law Centre, 2018

This report highlights the nature, extent and impact of LGBT conversion therapies in Australia.

The report is designed to help government, support services and faith communities to better respond to those experiencing conflict between their gender identity or sexual orientation and their beliefs.

The ‘revolutionary’ programs giving hope to LGBT domestic violence survivors

Updated 

Studies show people in same-sex relationships experience domestic violence at similar — and possibly higher — rates as opposite-sex couples.

But until recently survivors have suffered in silence and worse, been ignored and misunderstood by the health professionals and police who are supposed to help them, because of the persistent stigma and shame surrounding LGBT abuse and misconceptions that especially lesbian couples are immune from it.

OMID magazine for Afghan and Farsi speaking LGBT people

PEACE Multicultural Services, RASA, 2016

OMID is a new magazine for our Afghan and Farsi speaking friends around the world, who are same-sex attracted, trans-gendered or who are questioning their sexuality and/or gender. Whether you live in Australia, Afghanistan, Iran or anywhere else in the world, we hope that this magazine reaches you, provides you with valuable information and touches your heart. OMID (meaning hope), like a beacon of light at the end of a dark tunnel, is what keeps us going even in the toughest of times.”

OMID has a strong focus on health and well-being and is filled with stories, poems, personal experiences, film reviews and artworks. If you have a client, a friend or a family member that would like to contribute to the magazine in future or would like to know more about what PEACE Multicultural Services of Relationships Australia SA do and the support they offer, please email them on omid@rasa.org.au . The current issue is of OMID is November 2016.

  • Read, download or subscribe to issues of OMID here 

LGBT Seniors Are Being Pushed Back Into the Closet

The Atlantic, August 31 2016

Reluctance to reveal their sexual identity is widespread among non-heterosexual senior citizens in long-term care. A recent national survey of this population by the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging—which provides support and services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender elders—found that the respondents were frequently mistreated by care-center staff, including cases of verbal and physical harassment, as well as refusal of basic services. Some respondents reported being prayed for and warned they might “go to hell” for their sexual orientation or gender identity.

 

Cutting Edge Issues in Sexuality and Relationships Education (Forum)

SHine SA, October 2016

You are warmly invited to an interactive forum which will be held as an adjunct to the Australasian Sexual Health Conference being held in Adelaide, November 2016.

Who is this for? Teachers, community educators, health promotion officers, registered nurses and midwives, doctors, counsellors and other interested people.

Forum Themes • Taking gender and sexual diversity seriously • Confidence in teaching about sexual violence • Student ‘voice’ in sexuality education: problems and possibilities • Pre-service teacher education: the hope for change in sexual and relationships education

Panel Members

Professor Peter Aggleton: Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW Australia

• Dr Helen Calabretto: SHine SA

• Associate Professor Tiffany Jones: Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University

• Jane Flentje: Educational Consultant; former Coordinator Teacher Education, SHine SA

• James Castle: Schools Coordinator, Schools Education & Support, SHine SA; White Ribbon Ambassador

• Professor Bruce Johnson: School of Education, University of South Australia

• Natalie Terminelli: Teacher, Woodville High School

• Dr Debbie Ollis: School of Education, Deakin University

• Dr Deborah Bateson: Family Planning NSW; President, Australasian Sexual Health Alliance

When 16 November 2016: Registration: 3.00 – 3.20 pm; Forum: 3.20 – 6.00 pm

Where University of South Australia, City West Campus, BH 2.09 Lecture Theatre (Barbara Hanrahan Building)

Transport Public car parking is available in Hindley Street. Tram, bus and train transport are convenient to the City West Campus.

Cost $20 (includes refreshments).

Registration Click here to register by 5.00pm Monday 14 November. There will be limited places available at the door (cash only), but we would prefer pre-registration to assist us with catering.

Further information: Gemma Weedall (08) 8300 5394 or Helen Calabretto (08) 7099 5318

Download flyer here cutting-edge-issues-forum-flyer