Free ‘Law For Community Workers’ seminar (in person or online)

Legal Services Commission of South Australia, July 2017

“Helping Clients with Legal Problems”: This seminar will provide an overview of how to help clients with legal problems. It will cover issues such as providing legal assistance, related responsibilities such as confidentiality, how to access legal information, and options for referring clients who need further assistance with legal problems.

We will canvas the full range of services that are available from the Legal Services Commission – from our Legal Helpline to our online information options to applying for grants of legal aid.

Venue: In person at the Legal Services Commission, Level 3, 30 Flinders Street, Adelaide OR as an online guest via webcast

Session Details: Date: Thursday 3 August 2017, time: 12.30pm – 1.30pm

Enquiries: For further information contact Paula Meegan, Legal Education Officer, on 8111 5749 or via email 

Bookings: Seats are limited. Bookings are essential for both the live seminar and webcast.

Out of sight: the untold story of Adelaide’s gay hate murders

SBS, Oct 17th, 2016

For decades, gay bashers operated with impunity. Sometimes, they killed their victims. The police often didn’t care. Sometimes, they were said to be doing the bashing.

A culture of indifference meant the bodies piled up as the world looked the other way. But little is known about gay hate crimes outside those now widely documented in NSW. This SBS investigation explores alleged gay hate crimes in South Australia.

Read more: here

Listen to podcast episodes: 

Late one night in 1992, Rex Robinson pulled his car into one of Adelaide’s most notorious beats. High beam on, Rex sees a man lying face down, motionless in the middle of the road. It’s the night that embroiled Rex in a vicious bashing case which made headlines and outraged the gay community, leaving him without a job and wishing he’d never gone to the police.

Dr. George Duncan’s body was pulled from the River Torrens in 1972. At the time, homosexuality was illegal. Police were the suspects in the murder. It’s a case that’s gone on to become one of South Australia’s most notorious unsolved murders, altered history for all gay men in the state.

Beats are secretive places – they provide anonymity for men seeking sex, but this secrecy also provides a cover and protection for their attackers. “Todd” ran away at 16 and lived on the streets of Adelaide. The street kids he hung out with used to head to beats and used Todd as bait to lure men into the bushes because of how young he looked. This wasn’t the only group targeting homosexuals at beats.

David “John” Saint was an ordinary guy. He worked, bought three houses, did them up and sold them. On April 16, 1991, he was found covered in blood on a main Adelaide street by a passer-by. He didn’t make it. From day one, police said publicly that robbery was the motive. But this didn’t sit well with the gay community.

There is a way you can take a gay murder and make it not a gay murder. You get a good lawyer. This is what happened in 2011 to the brutal killing of Andrew Negre that continues to bounce around the legal system.

Stepping Stones: Legal barriers to economic equality after family violence

Women’s Legal Service Victoria, Melbourne , 2015

From Executive Summary:

Legal and economic problems arise from family violence which result in serious financial hardship for women and, at present, there are no accessible legal remedies to these problems.

We have researched the problems in the Stepping Stones project. This report contains the findings of the project and recommendations for solutions.
In interviews with women, we explored the consequences of family violence on women’s financial circumstances. We specifically directed our attention to systemic barriers women faced in their economic recovery.”

Download report (PDF) here

 

SA sexting laws unclear to teenagers, as courts see increase in underage sex cases

The law is struggling to keep up with teenagers having underage sex and using mobiles to send explicit photos to each other. Lawyers and judges in South Australia said they were seeing an increase in sexting and underage sex cases coming before the courts.

  • Read more here
  • Download app “The Naked Truth” here