Migrant women are particularly vulnerable to technology-facilitated domestic abuse

The Conversation, February 1, 2019 6.11am AEDT

Migrant women with temporary visa status are particularly vulnerable when it comes to domestic and family violence. That vulnerability is intensified when you add technology to the mix.

In our recent study, we analysed interviews with migrant women who had experienced domestic abuse about their experiences with technology-facilitated abuse. We found while technology can help women to reduce their isolation in a new country, a partner’s control of technology may increase isolation for migrant women, which can heighten the risk of abuse.

 

Preventing sexual violence against young women from African backgrounds

Prof. Donna Chung, Prof. Colleen Fisher, Dr. Carole Zufferey & Dr. Ravi K Thiara
Australian Institute of Criminology
Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice No. 540, June 2018

This study explored how young women from African refugee and migrant backgrounds understand and experience sexual coercion and violence.

Data was gathered from young women from African backgrounds and a wide range of agencies in two Australian states, Western Australia and South Australia, to better understand the extent of their awareness of and concern about sexual coercion and assault and document how agencies respond to these issues.

The paper concludes it is necessary to improve policy, practice, professional development and training to better respond to the sexual violence experienced by these young women, and raise awareness of the issue in their communities in a culturally sensitive way.

Documentary gives insight into risks of sexual assault among Australia’s international students

ABC NewsRadio Breakfast, First posted 27/04/2018 at 09:02:46
Half a million international students, most from Asia, are enrolled to study in Australia. It’s the country’s third largest export industry, worth $18 billion.

But Australia’s reputation as a safe and sunny place to study is under threat after widespread disclosures of rape and sexual assault.

Australia: Rape on Campus follows a six-month investigation into sexual assault at the country’s universities, exploring how international students, far from home and family, are especially at risk.

It follows an Australian Human Rights Commission survey which found 1.6 percent of students experienced sexual assault in a university setting in 2015 or 2016, one in five were international students.

Journalist Aela Callan is behind the documentary and she spoke to ABC’s Fiona Ellis-Jones from Berlin.

Her documentary, Australia: Rape on Campus, will be screened on Al Jazeera.

Queensland sex workers say current laws put their lives at risk

ABC Capricornia, 13/04/2018

Queensland sex workers say they face a dilemma — break the law to stay safe, or obey it and put their lives at risk.

Chrissie (whose last name is withheld) has been working as a fly-in, fly-out sex worker in regional Queensland for the past eight years and is one of many sex workers along with organisation Respect calling for a law change.

“I can’t think of any other occupation where you are prohibited from telling anyone where you are going for your own safety,” she said.

 

SA Govt funds SHINE SA for more mental health support for the LGBTIQ community during marriage equality survey

Ian Hunter MLC, September 16, 2017

The State Government will provide extra mental health and counselling services for the LGBTIQ community due to expected increases in demand while the marriage equality postal survey is conducted.

According to beyondblue, LGBTI Australians have an increased risk of depression, anxiety, self-harming and suicidal thoughts. And they are twice as likely to suffer physical, verbal and emotional abuse.

There is widespread concern throughout the community that these issues will be exacerbated, particularly among young LGBTIQ people, as the nation debates changes to the Marriage Act.

In response, the South Australian Government is providing a one-off payment of $100,000 to SHINE SA to deliver extra services to the LGBTIQ community throughout South Australia.

SHINE SA is the lead agency for health and wellbeing services to the LGBTIQ community in South Australia. With Rainbow Tick accreditation and the state licence to provide HOW2 training for inclusive services, SHINE SA will utilise its strong networks with the LGBTIQ community to provide face-to-face, telephone and online services to people experiencing emotional and mental health issues over the coming months.

Dedicated telephone outreach services for LGBTIQ South Australians living in remote and regional areas that face the additional challenges of distance and isolation will also be provided.

Forum this Friday – intersectional diversity: CALD and LGBTIQ

SHine SA, July 2016

Our identities often fall into several groups at one time. We call this intersectionality. This can lead to particular issues for people.
What are the issues faced by culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) people who also identify as LGBTIQ?
Join us as we explore the issues faced by CALD LGBTIQ people, including:
> Homophobia
> Racism
> Invisibility
> Stigma and discrimination
> Exclusion and isolation
> Impact on health and wellbeing

We will discuss personal and professional experiences.

The session will be facilitated by Khadija Gbla. Panel members include:
> Ben Yi (Community Support Worker, PEACE Multicultural Services)
> Anisa Varasteh (Community Service Coordinator, PEACE Multicultural Services)
> Leah Sarkanj (Social Worker, Multicultural Youth SA)
> Sharna Ciotti (Senior Social Worker, Families SA)

When 15 July 2016 (Friday)
Where SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time 1.30 – 4.30 pm
Cost $50 (Student Concession $25) – Light refreshments provided.

There are still places left, online enrolment here:
www.shinesa.org.au/events/refresh-forums

Enquiries Phone 8300 5317 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au