Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to ABC report on Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs)

SHINE SA, Issued: 13 December 2017

SHINE SA believes that decisions about contraception should be made in conjunction with a health care professional and that everyone should have access to accurate and unbiased information to enable appropriate informed contraceptive choice.

LARCs (Long Acting Reversible Contraception) including the levonorgestrel IUD1 (Mirena) and the subdermal implant (Implanon NXT) are the most effective reversible methods of contraception available. They have the additional advantage of being long lasting, convenient to use and generally well regarded by most users. LARC method failure rates rival that of tubal sterilization at <1% and unintended pregnancy rates are lower than those reported for contraceptive pill users.

Like all progestogen only contraceptive methods, LARCs may result in a change of bleeding pattern which may include no bleeding, frequent or prolonged bleeding. Users of the levonorgestrel IUD most commonly experience a reduction in bleeding over time and it is used as a treatment for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding for this reason. Only 1 in 5 users of the contraceptive implant have an increase in bleeding that persists beyond the first few months.

LARC use, and in particular the subdermal implant, is not known to be associated with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the upper part of the female reproductive system namely the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. PID is a known side effect of IUD insertion but occurs in less than 1 in 300 people. The risk of PID is only increased for the first 3 weeks after insertion, after which it returns to the previous background risk. Users of IUDs are encourage to return at any sign of infection and when treated promptly with antibiotics are unlikely to experience any long term complications.

New clinical guidelines to help with heavy menstrual bleeding

ABC Health & Wellbeing, 20/10/2017

25 percent of Australians who menstruate experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Now, new guidelines for doctors will help ensure these people have access to the best available treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

Professor Anne Duggan, senior medical advisor at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, said some patients were not being offered the full range of treatments.

clinical guidelines

Implementation resources

These resources can be used to promote and explain what the Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Clinical Care Standard means to health services, clinicians, patients and their carers.

 

Push to dispel myths about long-lasting contraception

Guardian Australia, Tuesday 26 September 2017 

Misplaced concerns and myths about long-acting reversible contraceptives have prompted medical experts to release Australia’s first consensus statement, saying they are more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill.

Despite their safety, efficacy and widespread use internationally, the uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is low in Australia. On Tuesday the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association released a consensus statement – endorsed by 18 agencies, including SHINE SA – on the use of LARCs.

Contraception for women living with violence

Children by Choice, Last modified on: 22 May 2017

Contraceptive use is often compromised for women living with violence. 

Contraceptive options that are safe and appropriate for one woman may not work for another. If you’re working with women experiencing violence, it’s important to explore each woman’s unique circumstances and draw on her own knowledge to assess the degree of comfort and safety with her contraceptive options.

Important factors to consider include whether the perpetrator is likely to:

  • Monitor the woman’s Medicare or prescription records through her MyGov account;
  • Restrict or monitor access to health care professionals;
  • Monitor menstruation and fertility patterns;
  • Engage in severe physical assaults;
  • Be actively searching for the use of contraceptive drugs or devices; and/or
  • Engage in rape and other forms of sexual assault.

This guide is not intended to replace a full medical consultation with a professional, but does provide a starting point for thinking further about which contraceptive options might be safest and most appropriate given an individual patient’s or client’s circumstances.

  • Read more here
  • Download full resource (PDF) here 

 

U.S. Abortion Rate Continues to Decline, Improvements in Contraceptive Use Credited

Guttmacher Institute, January 17, 2017

For the first time since 1975, the number of abortions in the United States dropped under one million (958,700 in 2013 and 926,200 in 2014). The abortion rate also continued to decline.

Improved contraceptive use in recent years has led to a decline in the U.S. unintended pregnancy rate, suggesting that women are increasingly able to plan their pregnancies and therefore have a decreased need for abortions.