Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV: An overview for Health Professionals

SHINE SA, October 2018

Access to PEP after an eligible exposure to HIV is a medical emergency. Your response to patients presenting for PEP can support them in preventing a life-long infection with HIV.

A brief, online training module has been created to support health professionals to:

• Increase your understanding of PEP as an emergency presentation and vital HIV prevention measure
• Assist you in providing patients with optimal care and support when seeking PEP in the emergency setting

This course is designed for Medical Officers and Registered Nurses in hospital emergency departments and targeted primary care clinical and rural sites that hold PEP starter packs in South Australia.

  • To register for the free PEP training module, please email us here with your name, position and workplace.

SA Health has contributed funds towards this program.

Indigenous Risk Impact Screen Training – Upcoming Dates

Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia (DASSA), August 2018

DASSA’s Aboriginal Workforce Development team would like to invite you to attend the 2-day Indigenous Risk Impact Screen training workshop.

The Indigenous Risk Impact Screen is a validated culturally appropriate and widely used tool for screening substance use and mental disorders in Aboriginal clients. It has been developed in partnership with Aboriginal communities and is used throughout Australia. The purpose of the training is to provide participants with the skills to screen, assess and deliver these clients, a brief intervention that is culturally secure. The workshop includes training in the use of the IRIS screening instrument, a two factor screen that assesses alcohol and other drugs and associated mental health issues.

The target audience is people working in the health and community sector who have contact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients who may have emotional health and/or alcohol and other drug issues.

The training is free to attend. Sessions will be held in Adelaide (booked out), Ceduna, Coober Pedy & Mount Gambier. Please see attached promotional document for details with date and venue.

Exploring HIV risks, testing and prevention among sub-Saharan African community members in Australia

International Journal for Equity in Health, 2018, 17:62

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-018-0772-6

Abstract

Background

Significant health disparities persist regarding new and late HIV diagnoses among sub-Saharan African (SSA) communities in Australia. Personal/cultural beliefs and practices influence HIV (risk, prevention, testing) within Australia and during visits to home countries.

Method

A community forum was conducted involving 23 male and female adult African community workers, members and leaders, and health workers; facilitated by cultural workers and an experienced clinician/researcher. The forum comprised small/large group discussions regarding HIV risk/prevention (responses transcribed verbatim; utilising thematic analysis).

Results

Stigma, denial, social norms, tradition and culture permeated perceptions/beliefs regarding HIV testing, prevention and transmission among African Australians, particularly regarding return travel to home countries.

Conclusions

International travel as a risk factor for HIV acquisition requires further examination, as does the role of the doctor in HIV testing and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). Further assessment of PrEP as an appropriate/feasible intervention is needed, with careful attention regarding negative community perceptions and potential impacts.

Scotland’s reduction in new HCV infections is due to harm reduction, not treatment

infohep, Published:12 June 2018

The reduction in new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections that has taken place in Scotland since 2008 is most likely due to increased provision of needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapy, rather than a reduction in the number of people with hepatitis C as a result of increased treatment of HCV infection, a modelling study published in the journal Addiction reports.

Researchers from the University of Bristol and three Scottish universities developed a model of the Scottish HCV epidemic to test the impact of varying levels of harm reduction provision.

HIV rapid testing in community and outreach sites: results of a demonstration project in Italy

BMC Public Health

2018 18:748

Published: 18 June 2018mob

Abstract

Background

Globally the access to HIV testing has greatly increased over the past 30 years. Nonetheless, a high proportion of people living with HIV remains undiagnosed, even in resource rich countries. To increase the proportion of people aware of their HIV serostatus and their access to medical care, several strategies have been proposed including HIV rapid test programs offered outside health facilities. The aim of this project was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the HIV rapid testing offered in community and outreach settings in Italy.

Methods

We conducted a national demonstration project on HIV rapid tests offered in community and outreach settings, including nongovernmental organization (NGO) facilities, primary care services for migrants and low-threshold services or mobile units for drug users (DU services). HIV rapid test on oral fluid (OraQuick®; Orasure Technologies) was anonymously offered to eligible people who presented themselves at the selected sites. Those with reactive results were referred to a specialized outpatient unit for confirmatory testing and medical care.

Results

Over a period of six months a total of 2949 tests were performed and 45.2% of individuals tested had not been previously tested. Overall 0.9% (27/2949) of tested people had a preliminary positive test. In NGO facilities the positivity rate was 1%. All subjects who performed their confirmatory test were confirmed as positive. In services for migrants the positivity rate was 0.5 and 80% were referred to care (with 1 false positive test). In DU services we observed the highest positivity rate (1.4%) but the lowest linkage to care (67%), with 1 false positive test.

Conclusion

Our project showed that the offering of an HIV rapid testing program in community and outreach settings in Italy is feasible and that it may reach people who have never been tested before, while having a significant yield in terms of new HIV diagnoses as well.

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Our Watch, July 18th 2018

Our Watch has today launched a resource aimed at tackling the horrific prevalence of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Changing the picture contains a set of clear actions that are needed to address the many drivers of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and is aimed at encouraging, guiding and supporting a national effort to prevent this violence.

Download report:

Report Changing the picture
Six-page executive summary
Background paper

Read more of article:

‘Changing the picture’ of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women