Intersex Peer Support Australia launches

Intersex Peer Support Australia (IPSA), 25th October 2019

On the eve of Intersex Awareness Day, an internationally observed awareness day designed to highlight human rights issues faced by intersex people, and observed on 26 October each year, one of the oldest intersex groups in the world is launching a new name, branding and website.

Intersex Peer Support Australia (IPSA) will carry on the important work of the 1985-founded Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Support Group Australia (AISSGA), which for more than three decades has been dedicated to assisting people born with variations in sex characteristics and their families, providing Australia-wide peer support, information and advocacy.

Elise Nyhuis, President of IPSA said, “The new identity will make us more visible to government agencies and support funders, and is more inclusive of the more than 40 known intersex variations, our diverse community and their families.”

“Our organisation advocates for and provides peer support to its members and the wider intersex community, focusing on the lived experience of having intersex bodies that physically differ from stereotypical, medical notions of male and female.

“The intersex community in Australia is strong and growing as people come out of hiding to stand together in the face of continued challenges from medicalisation, stigma and discrimination, shame, mental health issues, social inclusion, access to affirmative healthcare, parenting and human rights protection from medically unnecessary medical interventions on intersex children.

“Beyond our core work of providing intersex peer support, IPSA advocates for intersex issues through educating service providers, liaising with medical professionals, conducting policy review and consulting with government and NGOs, as well as by building community through coordinating opportunities and events for people with intersex variations to meet and share knowledge and experiences.

“The updated IPSA website will be a great resource for the whole community to learn more about the ‘I’ in the LGBTIQ acronym, while our membership will have access to a range of online extras through password-secured access,” said Elise.

Understanding the experiences of Culturally Diverse LGBTIQ+ Talent at Work

Diversity Council Australia, 2019

While many workplaces have developed LGBTIQ+ inclusion programs, they are not currently specifically addressing the cultural diversity of LGBTIQ+ people.

DCA, along with Pride in Diversity, is undertaking research to help better understand the experiences of Culturally Diverse LGBTIQ+ Talent at Work.

This project will help with understanding of the experiences of people of LGBTIQ+ people from culturally diverse backgrounds, and will assist in providing informed advice to workplaces about how to make inclusion initiatives work.

  • Are you or one of your colleagues an LGBTIQ+ person from a non-Anglo or a non-Main English speaking country cultural background?
  • Can you share your insights to help develop workplace guidance for Australian organisations wanting to better harness the skills and talents of LGBTIQ+ people from culturally diverse backgrounds?

What do I need to do?

He, she, or … ? Gender-neutral pronouns reduce biases – study

The Guardian, Tue 6 Aug 2019 

A new study has found that using a gender-neutral pronoun reduces mental biases that favour men, and boosts positive feelings towards women and LGBT people.

The finding marks an easy win, the researchers believe, and shows how a minor change in language can help chip away at long-standing gender inequities.

 

Scotland to embed LGBTI teaching across curriculum

The Guardian, 9/12/2018

Scotland will become the first country in the world to embed the teaching of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights in the school curriculum, in what campaigners have described as a historic moment.

State schools will be required to teach pupils about the history of LGBTI equalities and movements, as well as tackling homophobia and transphobia and exploring LGBTI identity, after ministers accepted in full the recommendations of a working group led by the Time for Inclusive Education (TIE) campaign. There will be no exemptions or opt-outs to the policy, which will embed LGBTI inclusive education across the curriculum and across subjects and which the Scottish government believes is a world first.

Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report

RMIT University, 16 Aug 2018

Less than a third of LGBTIQ+ employees in Australia are out to all their colleagues and this significantly compromises their wellbeing and work performance, new research has found.

According to the Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report released today, roughly 25 per cent of employees were out to some people and almost 40 per cent were out to most people at work.

The report was based on an online survey of more than 1,600 LGBTIQ+ workers about their experiences, as well as face-to-face think tanks with more than 60 LGBTIQ+ employees working at various levels across a range of organisations and industries.

The joint RMIT and Diversity Council Australia (DCA) report highlighted the complexities related to coming out at work – from coming out multiple times a day, week or year; coming out to some colleagues but not others; and being outed against their will.

Workplace culture, genuine bold leadership and policies were identified as the keys to creating an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff felt safe to come out.

Policy Consultation Forum: LGBTIQ and youth community feedback sought

SHINE SA, August 2018

LGBTIQ and youth community feedback is sought on SA Health Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive & Southern Adelaide Local Health Network (SALHN) Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. 

Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities and young people (under 30) are invited to an information session to learn about the draft Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive for SA Health as well as the draft SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. SA Health and SALHN, in partnership with SHINE SA, are facilitating an information and feedback session about these important documents. We look forward to hearing your views on the policy and model of care.

The SA Health Policy aims to provide a comprehensive overarching framework which consolidates equity and access requirements for South Australia’s diverse health consumers consistent with the South Australian Government Universal Access and Inclusion Guidelines (the Guidelines). The Policy is intended to provide strategic direction to SA Health employees, or persons who provide health care services on behalf of SA Health, to ensure that access to public health services is equitable for all South Australian health consumers.

The central purpose of the SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care is to provide high level guidance pertaining to the provision of safe and high quality care to Southern Adelaide Local Health Networks diverse mental health consumers. The core principles speak to the provision of person centred, evidence based recovery oriented care that is provided by an appropriately diverse multi-disciplinary team. Strong emphasis has been placed upon care delivery within the context of a culturally and linguistically safe service that engenders strong collaborative partnerships across agencies and between consumers, carers and health professionals. A Service Plan is being developed to operationalise the Model of Care, and both elements will be implemented in parallel once development is complete.

Tuesday, August 28 at 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

At SHINE SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide 5000

Free event

Light refreshments will be provided

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, hat and textmodel of care