Disrupting gender norms in health systems: making the case for change

The Lancet, Gender Equality, Norms, and Health Steering Committee, Published May 30, 2019

Summary

Restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities are replicated and reinforced in health systems, contributing to gender inequalities in health.
In this Series paper, we explore how to address all three through recognition and then with disruptive solutions.
We used intersectional feminist theory to guide our systematic reviews, qualitative case studies based on lived experiences, and quantitative analyses based on cross-sectional and evaluation research.
We found that health systems reinforce patients’ traditional gender roles and neglect gender inequalities in health, health system models and clinic-based programmes are rarely gender responsive, and women have less authority as health workers than men and are often devalued and abused.
With regard to potential for disruption, we found that gender equality policies are associated with greater representation of female physicians, which in turn is associated with better health outcomes, but that gender parity is insufficient to achieve gender equality. We found that institutional support and respect of nurses improves quality of care, and that women’s empowerment collectives can increase health-care access and provider responsiveness.
We see promise from social movements in supporting women’s reproductive rights and policies. Our findings suggest we must view gender as a fundamental factor that predetermines and shapes health systems and outcomes. Without addressing the role of restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities within and outside health systems, we will not reach our collective ambitions of universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals. We propose action to systematically identify and address restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities in health systems.

Understanding LGBTI+ Lives in Crisis (Report)

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University & Lifeline Australia, February 2019

This research report presents findings of lesbian (L), gay (G), bisexual (B), transgender (T), intersex people (I), and other sexual identity and gender diverse individuals (+) use of crisis support services (CSS) in Australia.

This is the first research of its kind in Australia that explores the needs of LGBTI+ people during a time of personal or mental health crises. It focuses on their uptake and familiarity with crisis support services in Australia, their perceptions and experiences with crisis support services, and where they might seek other professional mental health service support during a time of crisis.

This study enhances the evidence base for those working to design, resource or deliver services to meet the needs of LGBTI people in Australia during times of crisis.

Call for Papers: Edited Collection on Sexuality and Sexual Identities in Literature for Young People

Deakin University, October 2018

Acknowledging the capacity of literature to reflect and shape significant aspects of human development, this collection of essays takes as its central theme the representation of sexuality and sexual identities in texts for young people. Previous scholarship has established important connections between sexuality and gender, as well as sexuality and queerness, in literature for children and young adults. Investigations have also been made into the way particular genres and individual texts deal with desire, sex and sexuality.

This collection builds upon these individual approaches, while extending out to the analysis of various forms and incarnations of sexuality, across genres, texts and time periods. Keeping sexuality and sexual identities in writing for young people as its core focus, it will include analysis and discussion of representations of heterosexualities, homonormativity, trans subjectivities, asexuality, and the intersections between sexuality and other identity categories such as gender, race and class, across a range of texts and readerships.

The editors therefore welcome abstracts that revisit historical approaches to the study of childhood/adolescence and sexuality in literature, as well as those that provide contemporary and forward-looking models that take account of current and emerging sexual identities. Similarly, they welcome a wide range of theoretical approaches to this subject matter.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

• Sex and sexuality in historical literature for children
• Same-sex desire in young adult fiction from Stonewall to the AIDS era
• Hetero- and homo-normative families in picture books and junior fiction
• “Straightness” in junior and/or young adult fiction
• Queer spaces and queer geographies in writing for young people
• Trans identities in children’s texts
• Intersections between sexuality and race, class, gender, ability, age and/or nationality
• Transnational approaches to sex and sexuality
• Connections between romance narratives and ideologies around sex and sexuality
• Religion/religious themes and sexual morality
• “Post-gay” identities in millennial writing for young people
• The role of genre in depictions of sex and sexuality for young people

  • Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words and a biographical note of up to 150 words to Dr Kristine Moruzi  and Dr Paul Venzo  by December 1, 2018. Full papers of 6000 words will be due by May 1, 2019.

Landmark report tells stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with disability

 

LGBTIQ People Ageing Well Report released (SA)

COTA SA & South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance (SARAA), July 2018

The LGBTIQ People Ageing Well Project commenced in April 2017 as a 12-month
joint project between COTA SA and the South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance (SARAA). The main aim of the project was to engage with older people from South Australia’s LGBTIQ communities to find out what matters most to them as they age to better inform policy and create a groundswell for change to the policies that impact on the lives of older LGBTIQ people.

The project also celebrated the lives and contributions of older LGBTIQ people. Their
stories and lived experiences have the power to promote a greater understanding
of a unique set of issues, but also the power to create changes that will support and
enhance the lives of South Australia’s older LGBTIQ population.

This report makes a number of recommendations that can and will make a significant difference to the lives of older LGBTIQ South Australians, and must be addressed by all levels of government and the ageing and aged care sector.

 

 

 

Leadership Training Academy 2018 is coming

The Equality Project Australia, August 2018

In order to achieve meaningful social change we need to foster the training of a new generation of LGBTIQ+ advocates to lead the conversation, reshape the narrative, and ultimately, change the culture.

The Equality Project’s Leadership Training Academy (#LTA2018) is a specialised leadership and media engagement training program for LGBTIQ+ change-makers and emerging community leaders who want to build the core skills and techniques to effect positive social change.

They have compiled an exciting curriculum that includes programs from some of the largest LGBTIQ+ rights organisations in the world. These include the world-class GLAAD Media Institute and the Stonewall LGBTIQ Role Models program.

The Leadership Training Academy is designed for LGBTIQ+ advocates and emerging community leaders as well as professionals from any sector or industry who want to explore what it means to be an authentic and inclusive LGBTIQ+ role model in the workplace.

They are looking for a diverse range of participants particularly those who are from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, people of faith, people with a disability, women and non-binary people – and those at the intersections of these identities.

With the support of sponsors and training partners, the two 2-day leadership training program is one of the most affordable in the country. But if you are unable to attend due to cost they encourage you to apply for a scholarship.

Morning tea, afternoon tea and lunch included on both days.

The Leadership Training Academy will be held in October 2018 in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Canberra.