Gay Asian Proud free online event this Friday 18th September

Thorne Harbour Health, 16th September 2020

Gay Asian Proud (GAP) is excited to organise an online chat, Questioning Stereotypes And Assumptions, this Friday, 18 September, 6.00 PM – 8.00 PM pm AEST (5.30 PM  – 7.30 PM SA time). 

We welcome all GAP members, and Asian same-sex attracted men (cis and transgender).

If you are not a GAP member yet, please email gap@thorneharbour.org to be placed on our mailing list. We will invite you to upcoming events.

We want to hear your experience with stereotypes about Asian gay and bisexual men, the assumptions we make based on our cultural upbringing, our inherent bias, and how we could address them in a respectful way that facilitates intercultural understanding. This is your platform. We want to hear you talk.

Facilitated by James & Amirul, Coordinators of Gay Asian Proud (GAP), a social support group for Asian gay & bisexual men (cis and transgender).

Sign up now at Eventbrite to claim your FREE ticket! We can’t wait to see you this Friday! 

 

Impact of COVID-19 on Migrant and Refugee Women and Children Experiencing DFV

Women’s Safety NSW, Published: July 31, 2020

Whilst research on the prevalence of violence against migrant and refugee women is limited, what is known is that cultural, language and systemic barriers serve to reduce access to safety and support for this group of women, and they are at higher risk of domestic homicide. (AIC 2020)

This also corresponds with lower rates of reporting amongst migrant and refugee women experiencing domestic and family violence, as distrust for authorities, limited knowledge of rights and services and concerns about both material and cultural ramifications can serve as insurmountable barriers to accessing the supports needed. (AIFS 2018)

What has not yet been investigated is the specific impact of COVID-19 on migrant and refugee women experiencing domestic and family violence. This report from Women’s Safety NSW offers the experiences and professional observations of multicultural domestic and family violence specialists supporting hundreds of these very women at this critical time. What they’ve reported is that migrant and refugee women who are experiencing domestic and family violence are at higher risk than they have ever been before and that urgent action is needed if we are going to save lives.

Asian, Gay & COVID-19 (Free online event)

 Gay Asian Proud & Thorne Harbour Health, July 2020

A live online chat with James & Amirul – sharing their lived experience as same-sex attracted guys with Asian backgrounds.

Date And Time:

Thu, 6 August 2020, 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM ACST

Living Room Sharing Session:

Join Gay Asian Proud (GAP) coordinators James and Amirul in this casual, friendly and insightful conversation about being gay, Asian, moving away from home and living in the midst of COVID-19 restrictions.

Listen to them share their experiences about living in Australia, overcoming challenges as a migrant and international student, maintaining emotional and mental well-being during the COVID-19 lockdown.

This session welcomes all of the LGBTIQ+ community and their allies. Attendees will be able to ask questions during the online chat which James & Amirul will endeavour to answer in a live Q & A after the session.

Meet the guys:

Amirul (or Rul for short) is a proud GAY-sian guy, born and raised in Sunny Singapore and has been living in Melbourne, Australia for almost 8 years. He first arrived in Australia back in 2012 as an international student and calls Melbourne home for now. Originally starting out as a member, he is now one of the volunteer facilitators for the social support group, Gay Asian Proud,

James is a migrant from Singapore and a former international student who has been living in Australia for more than 10 years. He is a Thorne Harbour Health peer education facilitator, and a Community Reference Group member at the Victorian Pride Centre. He writes “The Well-Fed Nomad”, a Facebook food blog about his cooking and eating experiences around the world. His passion for arts and culture has brought him to Asia and Europe to participate in cross-cultural leadership and international collaboration programs.

New Guides: Family Violence Response for Women with Disabilities

Women with Disabilities Victoria, July 2020

WDV’s Workforce Development Team  have produced two new resources. These resources outline the best practice response to violence against women with disabilities, including supporting a woman who discloses experiencing violence, and lists a number of referral services.

(Please note some of the referrals are specific to Victoria. 1800RESPECT provide free and confidential counselling and referal to local services.)

Download resources: 

 

Pride in Prevention: A guide to primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities.

Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide

Produced by Rainbow Health Victoria for the LGBTIQ Family Violence Prevention Project 2019–202, launched 30 Jun 2020

Authors: Marina Carman, Jackson Fairchild, Matthew Parsons, Claire Farrugia, Jennifer Power and Adam Bourne.

The Pride in Prevention Evidence Guide  is now available to download.

This project forges new ground in the primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities, seeking to address critical evidence gaps, strengthen understanding of the drivers of violence, and build expertise for both LGBTIQ organisations and family violence primary prevention organisations to effectively deliver evidence-based programs.

Lived experience of sexual violence among trans women of colour from CALD backgrounds in Australia

ANROWS, June 2020

Crossing the line: Lived experience of sexual violence among trans women of colour from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in Australia

This research set out to increase understanding of the lived experience of being a trans woman of colour living in Australia, in relation to gender transitioning and experiences of sexual violence.

Using a large comparative survey, the research situates trans women of colour’s lived experience of sexual violence within the range of sexual violence experienced by other women, including lesbian, bisexual and queer women, and heterosexual women.

This research highlights that the experiences and needs of trans women in relation to sexual violence remain poorly understood by many healthcare providers, legislators, police and policymakers, with the experiences and needs of trans women of colour being the least understood. The absence of culturally competent information and knowledge about transgender experience, accompanied by misinformation, can lead to stigma, prejudice and discrimination, resulting in unmet health and justice needs for trans women.