SA drug bill risks another Stolen Gen: Aboriginal Health Council

InDaily, March 21st, 2018

The head of South Australia’s peak Aboriginal health body has warned that a State Government plan to enforce mandatory drug treatment on young people risks dispossessing Aboriginal children of their culture.

Aboriginal Health Council state branch CEO Shane Mohor has joined a growing chorus of social service and health bodies that have criticised the Controlled Substance (Youth Treatment Orders) Amendment Bill currently before state parliament.

People with disability are more likely to be victims of crime – here’s why

The Conversation, February 22, 2019 6.06am AEDT

Some of our most vulnerable citizens have been beaten, raped, and even killed at the hands of those supposedly caring for them.

The statistics are alarming. Up to 90% of women with disability have been sexually assaulted. And people with disability are three times as likely to die prematurely than the general population from causes that could have been prevented with better quality care.

But to provide victims with justice, we need to better understand why people with disabilities are more vulnerable to abuse and assault.

Police, families not told of sexual assault reports by mental health patients [Report]

The Age, 29 March 2018

Sexual assault claims made by mental health patients are not being reported to police or even the alleged victims’ families in most cases, a scathing report has revealed.

Families are told of allegations in only a quarter of cases, while police reports are made only 40 per cent of the time, leaving alleged victims at risk of further abuse.

A Fate Worse than Death? Being Transgender in Long-term Care

Psychology Benefits Society blog ( American Psychological Association), Oct 26, 2017

“I would kill myself.” This is what a 70 year-old transgender woman told me recently when I asked what she would do if she needed long-term care. While this sounds dramatic, it is a common sentiment among older transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) adults (Witten, 2014).

Many TGNC older adults do not have family caregivers available to meet their needs for assistance in later life, having been rejected and ostracized by their families of origin according to a study by Grant and colleagues (2011), and long-term care services may be their only option.

Read more of Being Transgender in Long-term Care

 

To tackle hepatitis C, we need to close the justice gap

Croakey, Dec 22, 2015

Health Minister Sussan Ley’s announcement of PBS listing for new treatments for hepatitis C has been welcomed by Hepatitis NSW as “brilliant news”. Given the high rates of hepatitis C among people in prisons, it is significant that the Government has agreed to fund these medicines for prisoners.

However, tackling hepatitis C will also require public health interventions such as the introduction of needle and syringe programs into correctional centres, and concerted efforts to reduce the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in prisons, according to Heather McCormack from Hepatitis NSW.

Read more here

 

The health of Australia’s prisoners 2015

AIHW, released: 27 Nov 2015

The health of Australia’s prisoners 2015 is the fourth report produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on the health and wellbeing of prisoners. The report explores the conditions and diseases experienced by prisoners; compares, where possible, the health of prisoners to the general Australian community and provides valuable insight into the use of prison health services.

New to the 2015 report are data on the disabilities or long-term health conditions of prisoners entering the prison system (prison entrants), self-assessed mental and physical health status of prisoners and data on smoke-free prisons

Of special note:

Chapter 6 (Communicable diseases) includes:

  • Sexually transmissible infections
  • Bloodborne viruses
  • Surveillance
  • Medication for Hepatitis C

Chapter 12 (Illicit drug use and needle sharing) includes:

  • Drug use prior to prison
  • Drug use in prison
  • Needle sharing
  • Opioid substitution treatment (OST)
  • Tattooing and body piercing

Chapter 14 (Injuries, assaults and unprotected sex) includes:

  • Head injury
  • Accidents or injuries
  • Assault and sexual assault
  • Unprotected sex

See full table of contents & download report (PDF) or read summary here