Rules about sex: getting them right – upcoming training day

SHINE SA, September 2018

This stand-alone workshop introduces participants to a wide range of education resources that may be borrowed from SHINE SA and provides permanent access to an electronic resource on CD that can be applied immediately in the workplace.

The CD based resource has been produced to assist workers and carers to assess knowledge and teach rules about touch and sexual behaviour and strategies for sexual safety and improved relationships.

In this practical full-day module, you will be supported to apply the resource practically and ethically, using your own laptop.

The aims are to:
> reduce sexual victimisation of people with disability
> reduce the incidence of sexual behaviours which may cause offence to others
> prevent vulnerable people with a disability from involvement with the law and possible long-term consequences of this

Suitable participants include: developmental educators, service coordinators, special
education workers, therapists, disability advocates, police and parents.

Important: Please bring a laptop computer with a CD drive, installed with MS Word,
MS Powerpoint, or equivalent. An external plug-in mouse will be an advantage.

Details:
When – Monday 22 October 2018
Where – SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time – 9:30am – 4:30pm
Cost – $175

 

Grey area: The fragile frontier of dementia, intimacy and sexual consent

The Globe & Mail (Canada), July 14, 2018

Amid ever-widening cultural conversations about sexual consent, dementia remains uncharted territory. As Canadians live longer, more are moving into long-term care with advancing dementia disorders. It’s a growing population with complex needs, not least of all in their intimate lives.

In the close-quarters environment of nursing homes, these people’s sexuality poses difficult ethical dilemmas for staff and for families

 

Informed consent, individual care vital to ensure reproductive rights of transgender Australians

The Conversation

By Damien Riggs

July 11, 2018 6.02am AEST

For any person needing medical care, informed consent is vital. Yet for transgender people, informed consent may be hindered by how medical professionals share information. This is especially the case in the context of reproductive health, where speaking about reproductive materials is often highly gendered.

Both the World Professional Association for Transgender Health Standards of Care and the Royal Children’s Hospital’s Standards of Care and Treatment Guidelines for Trans and Gender Diverse Children and Adolescents emphasise the importance of discussing fertility preservation as an option for transgender people. Yet little guidance is given on how to do so in ways that are inclusive.

Making sexual consent matter: one-off courses are unlikely to help

The Conversation, February 15, 2018 6.05am AEDT

In the wake of the findings of the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) 2017 national report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities, a number of universities have introduced mandatory courses on sexual consent for new students.

Of all students who participated in the AHRC inquiry, 26% experienced some form of sexual harassment in a university setting in 2016. Just over half had experienced sexual harassment at least once in the year prior to the survey.

Yes means yes: moving to a different model of consent for sexual interactions

The Conversation, January 30, 2018 5.13am AEDT

The rise of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements have put an unprecedented focus on the issue of what is acceptable sexual behaviour. An explosion of high-profile allegations in the Hollywood movie industry and in the Australian theatre scene have only added to the public scandal.

Of all the allegations of sexual misconduct swirling in Hollywood, the case involving Aziz Ansari is most divisive, because it centres on what constitutes consent. There is now pressure to move away from consent that can be implied or inferred, to a pure affirmation model, where only yes means yes.

 

HIV and hepatitis pre and post test discussion in Victoria: consultation report

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Nov 2017

In February 2017, the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University initiated a consultation which aimed to describe best practice in HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C pre and post test discussion in the Victorian context.

Building on existing evidence, and guided by the National Testing Policies, the purpose of this consultation was to better understand the components of a quality testing encounter in the era of elimination, with particular emphasis on the non-medical needs of people around the time of testing and diagnosis.

The focus of this consultation was to identify best practice in pre and post test discussion for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. A range of health and community providers and researchers discussed the fundamentals of best practice at length, and provided a great many insights into the components of quality testing services.
Importantly, most participants acknowledged that while best practice is a valuable notion, it is not attainable in all health care settings. Best practice, therefore, needs to be flexible enough to be able to fit into any setting where HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C testing may occur.