HIV Futures 9: deadline extended, last chance to participate, closes 28th May

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, May 2019

HIV Futures is a survey about health, treatments, work, finances, sex and relationships of people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV Futures is run by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and
Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, who are still seeking participants for HIV Futures 9.

If you are aged over 18 years and living with HIV, please fill in the online survey, it takes about 25 minutes.

HIV Futures is the largest and most influential Australian study of people living with HIV. It has been running for 21 years, and directly informs quality of life indicators in the National HIV strategy and is used for HIV community service planning and advocacy.

Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status, 2017

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet, Last updated: 15 June 2018

The Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status  aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The initial sections of the Overview provide information about the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, population, and various measures of population health status. The remaining sections are about selected health conditions and risk and protective factors that contribute to the overall health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These sections comprise an introduction and evidence of the extent of the condition or risk/protective factor.

The annual Overview is a resource relevant for workers, students and others who need to access up-to-date information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Accompanying the Overview is a set of PowerPoint slides designed to help lecturers and others provide up-to-date information.

Pregnant women are at increased risk of domestic violence in all cultural groups

The Conversation, April 26, 2018 6.00pm AEST

Domestic violence occurs across all age groups and life stages. Rather than reducing during pregnancy, expecting a child is a key risk factor for domestic violence beginning or escalating.

Our research, published today in the journal BMJ Open, found that 4.3% of pregnant women due to give birth in Western Sydney disclosed domestic violence when asked about it by a midwife at her first hospital visit. The study examined more than 33,000 ethnically diverse women who gave birth between 2006 and 2016, and found that these disclosures spanned all cultural groups.

Queensland strangulation law after one year: almost 800 charged

The Age, May 7, 2017

Almost 800 people have been charged with strangulation offences in Queensland in the past year, following a domestic violence crackdown.

Strangulation was added as a standalone offence to Queensland’s Criminal Code one year ago, because it is known to be an indicator of escalating domestic violence.

Closing the Gap: Six of seven targets ‘not on track’, life expectancy gap unchanged

The Age, February 14th, 2017

Australia is not on track to close the life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the divide widening and deaths increasing when it comes to cancer, the ninth annual Closing the Gap report has found.

 

An atlas of six South Australian communities: Mapping the influences on community wellbeing

DSCI & SA Health, 2016

An atlas of six South Australian communities: Mapping the influences on community wellbeing was produced for the South Australian Department for Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI) and the Department for Health and Ageing (SA Health).

Over the last three decades, numerous reports and studies have highlighted substantial variations in the wellbeing across the South Australian population, and the gaps between those who are doing well, and those who are not. These differences, or ‘inequalities’, are readily apparent across Adelaide, and our rural and remote communities, as they are in other areas of Australia.

This atlas describes the extent and significance of inequalities in individual and community wellbeing, particularly those associated with wider social and economic influences; and points to areas where the impacts of disadvantage across the lifespan, and, in many cases across generations, need to be addressed.

The atlas includes a number of communities in Adelaide and rural and remote parts of the State, identified by these Departments (DCIS and SA Health):

  • Playford and Salisbury in the outer north,
  • Onkaparinga, in the outer south;
  • Those in Regional South Australia are the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Aboriginal Community, Ceduna and Peterborough.

The information, presented as a series of indicators, highlights these inequalities and draws attention to the influence of social, economic and environmental factors on health and wellbeing. The ensuing picture is one of significant differences in outcomes in these communities, compared with similarly located areas.

Download atlas (PDF) here