Breaking the Binary Code: Celebrating gender and sexuality diversity

The Sexual Assault & Family Violence Centre (Victoria), 2020

Breaking the Binary Code: Celebrating gender and sexuality diversity, challenging stereotypes and relationship expectations is a 18-month primary prevention of family violence project. 

The project has a strengths-based approach working with LGBTIQA+ young people, community and stakeholders.

It was led in partnership with The Sexual Assault & Family Violence Centre, Barwon Adolescent Taskforce (BATForce), City of Greater Geelong, and Creative Geelong Inc, funded by the Victorian State Government under the Free from Violence Fund.

Project Objectives:

  • support the community in increasing awareness and understanding of what a healthy, safe and respectful relationship looks like in a LGBTIQA+ relationship;
  • challenge images of gender, sexuality and expectations in relationships, that are portrayed through pornography and the online environment, and promote healthy, safe and respectful relationships that are free from violence;
  • develop key terms to include in a narrative that will support parents/carers in having conversations with young LGBTIQA+ people about the subject matter; and
  • challenge the binary constructs of women and men and provide supportive and inclusive language for young people exploring gender and sexuality.

The project will engage in activities including:

  • Consultation and engagement
  • Use of inclusive language about gender, sexuality and family violence.
  • Develop a creative resource to support discussion and conversation about gender and sexuality diversity and relationships that are free from violence.
  • Challenge society binary constructs of gender and sexuality through challenging images within social norms, stereotypes and media, and stereotypes and relationship expectations

Resources

 

 

 

 

Lived experience of sexual violence among trans women of colour from CALD backgrounds in Australia

ANROWS, June 2020

Crossing the line: Lived experience of sexual violence among trans women of colour from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in Australia

This research set out to increase understanding of the lived experience of being a trans woman of colour living in Australia, in relation to gender transitioning and experiences of sexual violence.

Using a large comparative survey, the research situates trans women of colour’s lived experience of sexual violence within the range of sexual violence experienced by other women, including lesbian, bisexual and queer women, and heterosexual women.

This research highlights that the experiences and needs of trans women in relation to sexual violence remain poorly understood by many healthcare providers, legislators, police and policymakers, with the experiences and needs of trans women of colour being the least understood. The absence of culturally competent information and knowledge about transgender experience, accompanied by misinformation, can lead to stigma, prejudice and discrimination, resulting in unmet health and justice needs for trans women.

 

 

 

Embracing Community this International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia (Media Release)

SHINE SA Media Release: 15 May 2020

International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia recognises the strength and community spirit of LGBTIQA+ people, allows for broader community support, while at the same time acknowledging the stigma, discrimination and violence faced by LGBTIQA+ individuals.

A sense of community can contribute to self-worth and acceptance as well as address isolation. A safe and welcoming community for LGBTIQA+ people provides essential support. This is especially true given that sexuality, gender identity and intersex status aren’t necessarily visible. Having a community provides a voice to ensure that LGBTIQA+ people’s needs and concerns are being heard.

In this time of social distancing for all of us, it’s more important than ever to maintain a sense of community. For many LGBTIQA+ people the current environment makes it difficult to physically connect with their communities, which is especially important if individuals are in isolation with unsupportive people.

For those that identify as LGBTIQA+, there are many groups and spaces available to stay connected with communities in South Australia. Some of the online spaces and services include:

  • qsOnline, a discord based social space for LGBTQIA+ people ran by The Queer Society. It has a range of different channels allowing people to talk about any and all of their interests.
  • Trans Femme SHINE SA and TransMascSA, private Facebook groups for transgender people to socialize and discuss their personal experience.
  • Moolagoo Mob & Blak Lemons, a social space for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who identify as LGBTIQA+, including sistergirls and brotherboys.
  • SHINE SA’s Gender Wellbeing Service and Gender Connect Country SA provide free peer-based support over the phone and can help provide connections through groups and other safe spaces for those that identify as trans, gender diverse or gender questioning.

Awareness and support for LGBTIQA+ people should also extend into our workplace. LGBTIQA+ training is key to providing an inclusive workplace, to learn more you can visit SHINE SA’s LGBTI Inclusion Training page.

SHINE SA celebrates International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexism and Transphobia and recognises the particular strengths LGBTIQA+ people bring to all of our communities.

For further information and media enquiries contact Tracey Hutt, Director Workforce Education and Development 

 

Providing safe and remote services to LGBTIQ people due to the impact of COVID-19

Rainbow Health Victoria, April 2020

We would like to acknowledge the difficult time we all face with the current public health crisis caused by coronavirus (COVID-19). Overall, older people and those with underlying health conditions are more at risk. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities are known to have significant health disparities, which might influence disease outcomes. These include a greater risk for HIV, certain cancers, asthma, obesity and cardiovascular disease, and higher smoking rates.

Accessing available health and community support services is more important than ever for LGBTIQ communities. But barriers to accessing services – for example, expecting or experiencing discrimination – may be heightened at times of stress and upheaval. Rainbow Health Victoria has created this tip sheet to assist in providing safe and inclusive remote services to LGBTIQ people due to the impact of COVID-19.

Network MindOut webinar: The Impact of Bisexual+ Invisibility on Mental Health

National LGBTI Health Alliance, Recorded 24th March 2020

Bisexual+ people are thought to be the largest group in the LGBTIQ+ population, yet are commonly misunderstood by mainstream society and often invisible in the broader LGBTIQ+ discourse. Although many bisexuals are comfortable with, if not proud of their identity, research from around the world tells us that bisexual+ people are more vulnerable to systemic and individual victimisation than lesbians and gays, and mental health outcomes are particularly poor as a result. This webinar will explore the impacts of bisexual+ invisibility on mental health, and will offer practical tips on how to be more inclusive.

Presenter: Misty Farquhar is a PhD Researcher at the Curtin University Centre for Human Rights Education, where they also teach. Misty’s research explores how people living outside binary ideas of sexuality / gender experience recognition in Australia. Misty is extremely active in community outreach, education, and advocacy efforts and is the founder of Bisexual+ Community Perth.

Respect@Work: Sexual Harassment National Inquiry Report

Australian Human Rights Commission, March 2020

This Inquiry examined the nature and prevalence of sexual harassment in Australian workplaces, the drivers of this harassment and measures to address and prevent sexual harassment.

Since 2003, the Australian Human Rights Commission has conducted four periodic
surveys on the national experience of sexual harassment. The most recent survey showed that sexual harassment in Australian workplaces is widespread and pervasive.

One in three people experienced sexual harassment at work in the past five years.

Underpinning this aggregate figure is an equally shocking reflection of the
gendered and intersectional nature of workplace sexual harassment. As the 2018
National Survey revealed, almost two in five women (39%) and just over one in
four men (26%) have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace in the past
five years. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more likely to have
experienced workplace sexual harassment than people who are non-Indigenous (53%
and 32% respectively).