Women taking pill may be less likely to suffer ACL injury, study finds

The Guardian,

Disorders of penis development are on the rise and we’re not sure why

By Mark Green and Andrew Pask

In prenatal ultrasounds or at delivery, many new parents look between their baby’s legs: the presence of a penis is taken as a strong sign that it’s a boy.

For humans and other animals, development of a penis was thought to be driven by “male hormones” (androgens) produced entirely by the testes of the male fetus as it grows in the uterus.

However, a new paper released today indicates this might not be the case.

Clinical Education Forum: Menopause, mood and missing mojo

SHINE SA, 15/01/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of ‘Menopause, mood and missing mojo’.

This forum is available free of charge, and will also be recorded for future access.

This forum will cover management of menopause and a discussion of perimenopausal mood disorder and sexual dysfunction.

PRESENTER: Dr Amy Moten, SHINE SA Coordinator: Medical Education.

COST: Free. Light meal will be provided.
DATES: 5 February 2019
TIME: 6pm registration, 6.30 – 8.30pm
LOCATION: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum

Enrol now via this page https://www.shinesa.org.au/events/education-forums/

 

 

 

Transgender women taking PrEP have lower levels of PrEP drugs than cisgender men

aidsmap/nam, November 9th 2018

A study presented at October’s HIV Research for Prevention conference (HIVR4P) in Madrid shows that transgender women who are taking feminising hormones and also taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have levels of the PrEP drugs tenofovir and emtricitabine in their blood that are about 25% lower than those in cisgender men, and levels in rectal tissue cells about 40% lower. Tenofovir levels in rectal tissue were 44% lower.

However, the study also confirmed that the interaction between hormones and PrEP did not appear to go the other way; blood levels of estradiol, the one hormone all of the transgender women took in one form or another, do not appear to be affected by PrEP.

 

New free MOOC from Adelaide Uni: Sex and Human Reproduction

University of Adelaide, June 2018

AdelaideX’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offer learners free to study university-level online courses on a variety of topics.  AdelaideX’s latest MOOC, Sex and Human Reproduction, will launch on Thursday 12 July and enrolments are now open. 

Led by Professor Mario Ricci (Adelaide Medical School), and made in collaboration with experts from the Robinson Research Institute, this five-week course will cover all things related to sex and reproduction – from puberty to menopause, to fertility and contraception. The course focuses on underlying human biology, common myths, and the latest medical advances.

What you’ll learn

  • Structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems
  • Regulation of reproductive processes and cycles
  • Common reproductive disorders
  • Methods of contraception and assisted reproduction
  • Real world application of cutting-edge research in reproductive medicine

This MOOC is free (with a $50 fee for a verified certificate if desired).

 

 

New standards of care for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, 2017

The first Australian Standards of Care and Treatment Guidelines for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents, led Led by the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, have been released.

Dr Michelle Telfer, Head of Adolescent Medicine and Gender Services at the RCH, says health professionals, such as GPs, school counsellors and psychologists, from around the country often seek information from the RCH but until now only international guidelines had been available.

“With 1.2% of adolescents identifying as transgender, and referrals and requests for specialist support on the rise, there is definitely a need for Australia to have its own guidelines. Trans-medicine is a relatively new area of medical practise, and most doctors didn’t get taught how to manage the care of trans children and adolescents in medical school or in their later specialist training. These guidelines, developed by leaders in this field, will help to fill this knowledge gap,” she says.

The guidelines were developed using current evidence and the input of more than 50 specialists, and they have the endorsement of the Australian and New Zealand Professional Association for Transgender Health.

The guidelines include terminology, information about the unique clinical needs, treatment information, and the role of the various medical disciplines involved in the care.

Trans and gender diverse children and teenagers, and their parents, have also been consulted along the way.

“We frequently hear that many doctors, and other clinicians, don’t feel confident in what to do or say when they come across trans or gender diverse children or adolescents for the first time. With a guide to help them through all the stages of their care, our patients’ feel that they are likely to get better care and that others will also have a more positive experience when approaching doctors or psychologists,” she adds.